くたばれ!ユナイテッド -サッカー万歳!-(2009年)

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[amazonjs asin=”B005DJOZ1S” locale=”JP” title=”くたばれ!ユナイテッド -サッカー万歳!- コレクターズ・エディション  DVD”]1 EXT. ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 1

Heavy leaden skies over the arachnoid stands and floodlights
of Elland Road stadium: home to Leeds United football club.

And rain. Sheets of angry, Yorkshire rain.

TITLE: “THE DAMNED UNITED”

2 INT. BOARDROOM – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 2

Flashlights pop as DON REVIE, (late 40’s), the most
successful manager in English football, walks out in front of
a pack of newspaper and TV REPORTERS. He is flanked by the
Chairman of Leeds United, (MANNY CUSSINS, 60’s), and several
other white-haired blazer-wearing members of the Board.

REVIE
I’m just going to make a brief
statement.

CAPTION: “JULY 4th, 1974”

REVIE stands under a large trophy cabinet, filled with the
silverware he has won. REPORTERS wait: intimidated. Cowed.

REVIE (cont’d)
Yesterday afternoon at 3.00, I
accepted the FA’s offer to become the
next manager of the England national
football team.

A gasp among the JOURNALISTS. A burst of flashlights. The
BOARD MEMBERS look down at the floor in silence. Bereaved
fathers losing their favourite son.

REVIE (cont’d)
Obviously that involves me leaving
Leeds United after 13 happy and
successful years, which makes me very
sad. I’d like to think I have built
the club into a family and there must
be sadness when anybody leaves a
family. However, when one man goes,
another steps into his place. I know
who I think that person should be, the
man to replace me, and I shall make my
feelings clear to the directors. Thank
you. No further comments.

REVIE turns and walks out, a volley of REPORTERS shouting
questions…

FADE TO BLACK:

2

3 EXT. MOTORWAY – DAY – (1974) 3

We’re in a car. Tarmac passes beneath us. Roadmarkings.

OVER THIS: the sound of a flat Teeside voice, singing along
with Frank Sinatra on the radio…

VOICE (V.O.)
“Fly me to the Moon..”

4 INT. CAR – DAY – (1974) 4

Two young BOYS, (12, 9) stare out of car windows. Raindrops
on the panes of glass. Their father, BRIAN CLOUGH, (39),
slick, modern, cocky, handsome. About as big a contrast to
DON REVIE as it’s possible to find, is up front. Driving..

CLOUGH
(singing)
“And let me play among the stars..”

SIMON
When are we there?

CLOUGH
Any moment now. On the right.
(singing)
“Let me see what spring is like…”

The car turns a bend, and suddenly the floodlights and stands
of a football stadium come into view. The BOYS’ eyes widen.

BOY 1
There it is! Dad! There it is!
The BOYS smile in excitement.

CLOUGH
(singing)
“..on Jupiter and Mars..”

`LEEDS UNITED FOOTBALL CLUB’ written on the side of the
stadium. CLOUGH smiles, then puts his foot down. The car
accelerates past the turning. The BOYS’ smiles fade.

BOY 1
Where are you going? Dad? You’ve
missed it.

CLOUGH
We’ve something else to do first.
Won’t take long.
(singing)
(MO RE)
(CO NTINU ED)

3
4 CON TINUE D: 4
CLO UGH (cont’d)
“In other words, hold my hand. In
other words, darling kiss me…”

The MUSIC continues as the car drives on, turning into the
MUSIC of a television program..

5 INT. TELEVISION STUDIO – DAY – (1974) 5

The `CALENDER’ front title sequence, a Yorkshire TV current
affairs program. We’re in a TV studio. The presenter is
AUSTIN MITCHELL, (40)..

MITCHELL
Today we welcome Brian Clough as he
starts his new job as manager of Leeds
United, taking over from Don Revie –
the most successful manager in the
club’s history, under whom Leeds have
won everything..
CLOUGH
..not QUITE everything. Not won the
European Cup…

MITCHELL
…but pretty much everything else.
Daunted?

CLOUGH
Daunted? Not at all, Austin. Looking
forward to it.

MITCHELL
The biggest challenge of your life,
and you’ll be without Peter Taylor,
for the first time. Your lifelong
professional colleague.

CLOUGH
Yes, Pete’s at Brighton now. He had
the opportunity to come with me, but
Brighton was his choice. Leeds was
mine.

MITCHELL
A surprising choice, some might say.
Because you’ve been very vocal in your
criticism of them over the years.

CLOUGH
I have.

(CO NTINU ED)

4
5 CON TINUE D: 5

MITCHELL
You’ve accused players of dirty
tactics, cheating, dissent, foul play.
You called Norman Hunter, Norman
“Bites yer legs” Hunter, you’ve said
Peter Lorimer falls when no one
touches him…

CLOUGH
And I was right.

MITCHELL
I’m curious. Why do you now show such
alacrity to joining them after such
vituperative criticism of them for so
long?

CLOUGH
Goodness, it’s going to take me half
an hour to explain all those words for
a start.

Laughter from the camera CREW..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Football is a beautiful game, Austin.
It needs to be played beautifully. I
think Leeds have sold themselves
short…

5A INT. REVIE’S HOUSE – SAME TIME 5A

CLOUGH’s interview continues on a TV in a sitting-room, where
it is being watched by Don Revie, sitting in an armchair…
CLOUGH (ON TV)
..they’ve been champions but they’ve
not been good champions in the sense
of wearing the crown well. They’ve not
been loved. But then that’s hardly
surprising, given the type of
operation there’s been in place there.

5B INT. YORKSHIRE TV STUDIOS – DAY 5B

CLOUGH continues…

CLOUGH
Football clubs are like families,
footballers are sensitive people. I’d
like to bring a little warmth into the
set-up…

(CO NTINU ED)

4A
5B CON TINUE D: 5B

MITCHELL
“That type of operation?” I presume
you’re referring to Don Revie..

CLOUGH
I am..

5C INT. REVIE’S HOUSE – SAME TIME 5C

REVIE continues to watch the TV…

MITCHELL
..who has long been regarded as a
father figure in Leeds. And now you’re
coming in as the outsider, the enemy
even, after all the things you’ve said
in public, coming in and taking ouver
as STEPfather.

5D INT. YORKSHIRE TV – SAME TIME 5D

MITCHELL looks up at CLOUGH…

(CO NTINU ED)

5
5D CON TINUE D: 5D

MITCHELL
Don’t you expect some degree of
resentment to this?

CLOUGH
I would accept and expect a
strangeness, initially, it’s perfectly
normal. But it won’t be long before
they realise I’m a fair man. A kind
man. And maybe under me they can
experience what it’s like to be in a
happy family, after all.

MITCHELL
How can you be sure they weren’t happy
with Don all along?

CLOUGH
They wouldn’t have played football
that way if they were happy.

5E INT. REVIE’S HOUSE – SAME TIME 5E

DON REVIE’s eyes burn with indignation. He picks up a
telephone, and angrily starts to dial..

6 EXT. TRAINING FIELD – DAY – (1974) 6

Here they are. The Leeds PLAYERS. Long hair and long faces.
Surly. Truculent. Dangerous.

Out on the practice pitch. In the rain. Some doing warm-up
exercises. Others milling dangerously in groups. Their names
on their purple track suits.

HUNTER, LORIMER, GILES, BATES, GRAY, CLARKE, BREMNER, MCQUEEN

7 EXT. CAR PARK – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 7

CLOUGH’s car pulls up. He and his sons get out. A few waiting
press. Cameras. Lights. A few FANS with autograph books.

JIMMY GORDON
Where have you been, boss?

JIMMY GORDON, CLOUGH loyal trainer, his face creased with
anxiety..

JIMMY
Directors have been waiting more than
an hour. C’mon..

(CO NTINU ED)

5A
7 CON TINUE D: 7

JIMMY GORDON leads CLOUGH past the training pitch. CLOUGH
looks out..

(CO NTINU ED)

6
7 CON TINUE D: (2) 7

CLOUGH
Morning lads! Lovely Yorkshire
weather!
(gestures shivering)
I tell you makes me want to jump on a
plane right back to Majorca!

CLOUGH laughs. The PLAYERS stare in silence. Squinting in the
drizzle. Condensation coming from their mouths.

JOHNNY GILES stares. BILLY BREMNER spits and continues
talking disrespectfully.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Not much of a welcome, was it? And not
so much as a smile from Johnny Giles.

JIMMY
You’re five days late!! And did you
really need to say that about Majorca?
(beat, changing the
subject)
You know he was Revie’s first choice
for getting your job.

CLOUGH
Who? Johnny Giles?

CLOUGH looks over at GILES, who turns away, resumes
training….

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Was he now? And Bremner?

JIMMY
Club Captain. Don’s son and heir. His
first born. You’re never going to get
any love from him.

BREMNER, a flint-eyed Scot, stares at CLOUGH..

CLOUGH
Great. Here’s to happy fucking
families.

8 INT. CORRIDOR – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 8

JIMMY GORDON leads CLOUGH and his BOYS down a corridor, where
countless photographs of DON REVIE hang on the walls. Holding
silverware.

They pass an open door, with a sign outside, `MANAGER. Mr.
DON. REVIE.’ CLOUGH stops. Looks at the sign.

(CO NTINU ED)

6A
8 CON TINUE D: 8

Then pushes open the door..

7

9 INT. MANAGER’S OFFICE – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 9

CLOUGH walks into the manager’s office. The empty chair. The
bare desk. His desk. Don’s desk.

CLOUGH takes a seat in the chair.

Presently, a middle-aged matron, JEAN REID, Don Revie’s
faithful SECRETARY for 13 years, appears in the doorway..

CLOUGH
Any chance of a cup of tea, duck?

JEAN
They’re waiting for you. Upstairs.

CLOUGH swings his feet on the desk.

CLOUGH
Who’s that?
JEAN
The Directors.

CLOUGH
For me? Why?

JEAN
For the board meeting.

CLOUGH
Let them wait. Now, how about that cup
of tea?

CLOUGH smiles sweetly, but JEAN stares at CLOUGH. She
pointedly doesn’t move. CLOUGH lowers his feet.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
All right, I’ll go then. Wouldn’t want
to get off on the wrong foot.

CLOUGH walks over to the door. Looks at the desk.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Who’s desk is that, love?

JEAN
Yours, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH
Not mine. I didn’t put it there, did
I?

JEAN
Mr. Revie’s.
(CO NTINU ED)

8
9 CON TINUE D: 9

CLOUGH
Let’s get rid of it then, shall we?
Chairs, too. The whole bloody lot.
Think it would be best if there were
nothing of his left here.

CLOUGH reaches the door..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Were you his secretary?

JEAN
I was. For thirteen happy years.

CLOUGH
What’s your name, pet?

JEAN
Jean, Sir. Jean Reid.
CLOUGH
In which case, no offence duck, but
there’s nothing I want typed on paper
from you other than your resignation.

She gasps..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
And you can change the locks on your
way out. Don’t want the ghost of
troubled Don popping in now, do we?
Rattling his chains. Scaring my young
ones.

CLOUGH puts his arms protectively round the BOYS, and leads
them out of the door. JEAN REID stares, visibly shaken.

10 INT. BOARDROOM – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 10

Half-a-dozen white-haired patriarchs sit at a large table.
Matching blazers and matching brass. MANNY CUSSINS, SAM
BOLTON, BOB ROBERTS, SYDNEY SIMON, PERCY WOODWARD.

Aldermen and Rotary club members. Masons and businessmen.

CLOUGH enters the boardroom. Indicates to JIMMY GORDON to
look after the BOYS outside. Inside: matching curtains and
carpets.

CUSSINS
Come in, Brian.

CLOUGH sits down at the head of the table. Rubs his hands
together..
(CO NTINU ED)

9
10 CON TINUE D: 10

CLOUGH
What? No one going to offer me a
drink? Like an undertakers in here.

The DIRECTORS shoot looks at one another.

CUSSINS
Why did you do it?

CLOUGH
Do what?

BOLTON
The interview. For Yorkshire TV.

CUSSIN
We’ve had a phone-call.

BOLTON
Not so much a phone-call. Bloody
tirade.

CUSSINS
From Don. They only went and rung him.
And ran some of your quotes by him.
About how unhappy the players were.
What “bad champions”. Looking for a
response.

BOLTON
(shudders to himself)
Bloody got one, as well. He’s gone
berserk.

CLOUGH
He had it coming. He shouldn’t have
done that piece in the Mirror should
he? Saying he thought I was a daft
choice.

BOLTON
He’s entitled to his opinions.

CLOUGH
And I’m entitled to mine.

CUSSINS
(barks, flame on)
And I’m entitled to MINE.

The room falls silent. That got everyone’s attention.

(CO NTINU ED)

10
10 CON TINUE D: (2) 10

CUSSINS (cont’d)
I hired you to do this job because I
think you’re the best young manager in
the country…

CLOUGH
Thank you. I’m the best old one, too.

CUSSINS
…I also did it under the assumption
that you’d be coming here wanting the
best for the club. For the city of
Leeds. So why do I still get the
feeling this is all about you and Don?

CLOUGH
Of course it’s just about me and Don.
Always has been. But instead of
putting frowns on your foreheads, o ye
elders of Leeds, in your blazers and
brass fucking buttons, it should put
big white Colgate smiles on your big
white faces, because it means I won’t
sleep and won’t eat until I take
whatever that man’s achieved and
beaten it — beaten it so I never have
to hear the name “Don Fucking Revie”
again — beat it so the only name
anyone sings in their Yorkshire ale
houses, raising their stinking jars to
their stinking mouths, is Brian
Clough. Brian Clough uber fucking
alles. Understand?

The blazers and brass buttons, WHITE-HAIRED ELDERS of Leeds
stare at one another.

CUT TO:

11 OMITTED 11

10A-11

12 INT. FRONT ROOM – CLOUGH’S HOUSE – DERBY – NIGHT – (1968) 12

CLOUGH sits glued to a wireless in his front room.

RADIO ANNOUNCER
..Ladies and Gentlemen, the draw for
the third round of the FA Cup will now
commence..

CLOUGH’s eyes widen: he calls out to the others..

CLOUGH
C’mon, Pete!

WHITE-HAIRED ELDER
Number twenty-two..

RADIO ANNOUNCER
Derby County, second division..
CLOUGH
Here we go. That’s us..!

CAPTION: “SIX YEARS EARLIER”

PETER TAYLOR, seven years older than CLOUGH, his closest
friend, his only true friend, appears breathlessly in the
doorway back from a fish and chips run…

..followed by BARBARA, Clough’s wife, and the three
children..

WHITE-HAIRED ELDER (ON RADIO)
Number six..
ON TV: the BLAZER-WEARING ELDER calls into the microphone..

BLAZER-WEARING ELDER (ON RADIO)
Leeds United!

RADIO COMMENTATOR
Against mighty Leeds United..!

CLOUGH and TAYLOR cry out in shock..

CLOUGH
Leeds..!

TAYLOR
Fucking hell..!

CLOUGH
Don Revie’s Leeds! Top of Division
One! Here we bloody come!

(CO NTINU ED)

12
12 CON TINUE D: 12

The telephone rings. CLOUGH picks it up..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
(already knowing it’ll be
SAM LONGSON)
What do you say to that, Mr. Chairman?

13 INT. SAM LONGSON’S HOUSE – NIGHT – (1968) 13

He’s right. It’s SAM LONGSON, Chairman of Derby County,
(60’s) looks like Krushchev, cue-ball head, voice like a
power-drill, a tough haulage millionaire..

UNCLE SAM
I can hear the cash registers now!

CLOUGH
Happy days, Sir. Happy days.
UNCLE SAM
You’re not wrong, Brian. Take the
family out for a meal. Go to The
Mumtaz. Tell `em I’m paying.

14 INT. CLOUGH’S HOUSE – NIGHT – (1968) 14

CLOUGH hangs up the phone..

CLOUGH
Put the fish and chips in the bin.
Tonight’s on Uncle Sam. We’re going
posh. Chicken fucking bhuna in town.
General excitement. Everyone starts putting on their coats.

15 EXT. BASEBALL GROUND – DERBY – DAY – (1968) 15

CLOUGH stands with two men in overalls, indicating a fading
`Visitors’ sign…

CLOUGH
Right, you two, I want Billy Bremner
and Johnny Giles to be able to read
THAT…
(indicates door-frames)
And this woodwork has seen better
days..

12A

16 INT. BASEBALL GROUND – DERBY – DAY – (1968) 16

`Crash’, the following morning, CLOUGH bursts through swing
doors, and into corridors with the CLEANERS…

(CO NTINU ED)

13
16 CON TINUE D: 16

CLOUGH
Spick and span, understand? Wash these
walls down. Give the floors a proper
polish.

17 EXT. PITCH – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 17

CLOUGH inspects the pitch with the HEAD GROUNDSMAN..

CLOUGH
I want it perfect. Like a fucking
carpet. We’ve got proper footballers
coming. Who know how to keep the ball
on the deck.

GROUNDSMAN
Well, you can’t fucking train on it
then.

18 EXT. PITCH – PUBLIC PARK – DERBY – DAY – (1968) 18

The Derby PLAYERS train on a football pitch in a public park.
CLOUGH turns to TAYLOR..

CLOUGH
You know he’ll be making a file on us.
A dossier.

TAYLOR
Who?

CLOUGH
Don Revie. Prepares a file on every
game. Leaves nothing to chance. Knows
every opponents formations.
Strategies. Everything.

TAYLOR
I’ve heard he’s a superstitious twat.
(calling out)
Ey..! Help him, someone HELP him..!

CLOUGH
We grew up just a few streets apart,
you know. In Middlesborough, close to
Ayrsome Park. He’ll have known my
street, Valley Road – probably bought
sweets from Garnetts Factory, where my
dad worked.

TAYLOR
Heard he wears the same suit to every
game. His “lucky blue suit”.
(MO RE) (CO NTINU ED)

13A
18 CON TINUE D: 18
TAY LOR (cont’d)
And he doesn’t care for ornamental
birds. C’mon, who’s covering him…!

(CO NTINU ED)

14
18 CON TINUE D: (2) 18

CLOUGH
The best manager in the country, Don
Revie. Played for Sunderland, like me,
as a centre-forward, like me, and
England, like me.

TAYLOR
(shouting out)
C’mon, give it and go!

CLOUGH
Peas in a pod, me and Don. Two peas in
a fucking pod.

19 INT. CORRIDOR – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 19

CLOUGH in early. Before anyone. In shirtsleeves, sweeping
corridors. Straightens photos on the wall.

20 INT. ANOTHER CORRIDOR – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 20

CLOUGH polishing the sign, `VISITORS’ on the dressing-room
door.

21 INT. BATHROOMS – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 21

CLOUGH on his knees, scrubbing, cleaning baths in the
visiting team’s washrooms.

22 INT. MANAGER’S OFFICE – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 22
CLOUGH puts on his suit. Ties his tie. He takes a bottle of
vintage red wine from a cupboard.

He places the bottles on his desk. Then puts two cut crystal
glasses on his desk. His and Don’s.

A flicker of jealousy on PETER TAYLOR’s face, almost like a
wife – hurt that his friend is making such an effort for
someone else.

A knock on the door. JIMMY GORDON appears in the doorway..

JIMMY
They’re here!
(a confused look)
Well, almost..

15

23 EXT. CAR PARK – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 23

CLOUGH rushes out of the doors, straightening his cuffs,
straightening his hair, buttoning his jacket. First out to
greet the arriving team.

He turns the corner to see the LEEDS COACH a hundred yards
down the street, the PLAYERS getting off the coach and
walking towards him..

CLOUGH
What are they doing?

JIMMY
They’ve run out of petrol.

TAYLOR
No, it’s that superstition, isn’t it?
Every away cup ties, Revie makes them
walk the last hundred yards.
TAYLOR mutters under his breath, “Soppy twat”.

CLOUGH cranes his neck. Watches DON REVIE, 40’s. Thick-set.
Severe, forbidding, intimidating, in a huddle with his
coaching staff, Les Cocker and Syd Owen. His henchmen. His
assassins. His “Goodfellas”. His right and left hand.

CLOUGH walks towards him. Hand outstretched..

CLOUGH
Welcome to Derby, Don. Pleasure to
meet you. I’m Brian Clough.

But REVIE walks past without shaking hands, without talking,
without even breaking stride..

..and disappears into the stadium, deep in conversation with
Les Cocker and Syd Owen.

CLOUGH stares. Hand still outstretched. He looks over at
PETER TAYLOR, who can’t help smiling, `Forget it’.

TAYLOR and JIMMY GORDON walk off, but CLOUGH still stares at
REVIE in disbelief.

24 EXT. DUG-OUT – TOUCHLINE – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 24

The LEEDS PLAYERS run out onto the pitch: HUNTER, MADELY,
BREMNER, GILES, REANEY, JONES, in a line, waving to the
crowd, turning North, South, East, West…

(CO NTINU ED)

15aA
24 CON TINUE D: 24

TAYLOR rubs his hands in excitement, “Here we go”. But CLOUGH
is miles away. Still cannot let the insult go. He stares over
at the visiting team dug-out..

(CO NTINU ED)

15A
24 CON TINUE D: (2) 24

REVIE and his lieutenants. Whispering among themselves.
Huddled in thought. Huddled in strategy. Huddled in
malevolence.

Presently, the game starts. A roar from the crowd.

(CO NTINU ED)

16
24 CON TINUE D: (3) 24

“Beeeep”, the REF’s whistle blows. A Derby PLAYER rolls in
agony, cries out, a terrible, cynical challenge. Horrified,
JIMMY GORDON and PETER TAYLOR up on thier feet in protest..

TAYLOR
Referee..!

CLOUGH looks over to REVIE’s bench. Sees REVIE and SYD OWEN
quietly applauding the Leeds PLAYER. Encouraging more of the
same. As the Derby PLAYER is stretchered off..

Presently, RRROOOOAAAARRRRR goes up. Goal Leeds. REVIE and
his henchmen get to their feet. Applauding. 1-0.

TAYLOR and JIMMY GORDON immediately start shouting out
encouragement to the Derby PLAYERS, new instructions, as the
game restarts..

TAYLOR (cont’d)
C’mon, keep your shape! Close him
down!

JIMMY
Think, Alan! To feet!

TAYLOR
Now sent it out wide!

CLOUGH doesn’t join in. He continues to stare at REVIE in his
dugout.

Suddenly:

“Beeep!”, whistle! Penatly Leeds! CLOUGH leaps off the bench
in outrage. Screaming, on his feel, protesting in disbelief..
CLOUGH
What? He didn’t fucking touch him!
Ref! He DIVED! He fucking dived!

REVIE shaking hands with his COLLEAGUES. Smiling amongst
themselves. Congratulating themselves. Celebrating.

The inevitable roar as Leeds convert, followed by,
“Beeeeeep”, the sound of the final WHISTLE. CLOUGH stares in
disbelief. Robbed. Deflated.

The REFEREE blows the whistle for the end of the game.

CLOUGH watches as REVIE and SYD OWEN brush past, shaking
PETER TAYLOR and JIMMY GORDON’s hands, (assuming TAYLOR’s the
manager), on their way to the dressing-rooms, their minds
already on their next game…

CLOUGH stares as they go..

16aA

25 INT. MANAGER’S OFFICE – DERBY – LATE AFTERNOON – (1968) 25

The two empty glasses waiting on the table.

CAPTION: “DERBY 0 – LEEDS 2”

(CO NTINU ED)

16A
25 CON TINUE D: 25

CLOUGH
Didn’t say good-bye. Or pay me the
respect of staying for a drink.
Couldn’t wait to get away.

Through the front door we see: DON REVIE, SYD OWEN and LES
COCKER walking to their bus, chuckling to themselves, deep in
discussion, already thinking about the next match.

TAYLOR
Bloody cheats and all. Neither of
those goals should have been allowed.

But CLOUGH doesn’t hear…

CLOUGH
Just going to have to beat them, Pete.
Beat him it’s the last thing I do.

TAYLOR
We need to get into the same division
first.

(CO NTINU ED)

17
25 CON TINUE D: (2) 25

CLOUGH
We need someone with a good head.
Experience.

TAYLOR
I know. Our lot were like headless
chickens out there today.

CLOUGH turns to TAYLOR…

CLOUGH
First thing Monday morning, I want you
to go and find me that player. A wise
head.

TAYLOR opens his mouth, is about to protest..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
And don’t worry about the money.
That’s my problem. Just you go and
find him.

CLOUGH’s face: watching the Leeds PLAYERS board the bus…

CUT TO:

26 INT. MANAGER’S OFFICE – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 26

CLOUGH’s face: staring out at the Leeds PLAYERS waiting on
the training pitch. A deep breath.

CLOUGH
Right. Better go and make myself
known.
CLOUGH removes his jacket. JIMMY GORDON and CLOUGH’s SONS
watch as he walks out onto the training pitch…

27 EXT. TRAINING PITCH – FOLLOWING DAY – (1974) 27

CLOUGH walks out into the drizzle and towards the LEEDS
PLAYERS..

CLOUGH
(up-beat, clapping hands)
All right, gentlemen, gather around,
please.

The players truculently gather round. CLOUGH watches them,
notes their mood, then..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
I might as well tell you now.
(MO RE) (CO NTINU ED)

18
27 CON TINUE D: 27
CLO UGH (cont’d)
You lot may all be internationals and
have won all the domestic honours
there are to win under Don Revie, but
as far as I’m concerned, the first
thing you can do for me is to chuck
all your medals and all your caps and
all your pots and all your pans into
the biggest fucking dustbin you can
find because you’ve never won any of
them fairly. You’ve done it all by
bloody cheating.

Silence from the PLAYERS..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Mr. William Bremner. You’re the
captain. And a good one. But you’re no
good to the team and you’re no good to
me if you’re suspended. I need you fit
for every game, and I want good,
clean, attractive football from my
captain. Setting an example.

CLOUGH turns to PETER LORIMER.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Mr. Lorimer, I hope you were listening
because you’re as good a footballer as
I’ve ever seen, but you know how I
feel about the way Don let you
harangue referees, fall over when
you’ve not been touched, protesting
and pointing, trying to get other
players booked. We’ll have no more of
that.
CLOUGH turns to JOHNNY GILES..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
And you, Irishman. God gave you skill,
intelligence, and the best passing
ability in the game. What God did not
give you was six studs to wrap around
another player’s knee.

GILES
I don’t know what you’re talking
about.

CLOUGH turns to NORMAN HUNTER…

CLOUGH
But you do, though, “Bites yer Legs”.

(CO NTINU ED)

18A
27 CON TINUE D: (2) 27

HUNTER
People kick me, I kick them back.

(CO NTINU ED)

19
27 CON TINUE D: (3) 27

CLOUGH
Not with me as manager. Do that on my
watch, you’ll be fined and stuck in
the reserves.
(to all the PLAYERS)
Things are going to be a little
different around here. Without Don.
Might feel a little strange at first.
Might pinch a little. Like a new pair
of shoes. But if you want your
grandchildren to remember you for
being something other than the dirty
buggers you all were, if you want to
be loved as REAL champions, WORTHY
champions, you’re going to have to
work. And improve. And change.
(nods to JIMMY GORDON)
Now let’s start off by playing some
seven-a-sides.
PLAYERS stare at one another. Bristling. Disbelieving looks.

BREMNER
Don never did that.

CLOUGH
Well, I’m not Don. And from now on I
never want to hear that man’s name
again. Ever. Next player who mentions
it, or what he did or didn’t bloody do
in the good ol’ days, will spend a
week cleaning my boots.
(clapping hands)
Seven-a-side. Keep it nice and clean,
and sensible. No fifty-fifty’s.
CLOUGH sees that one side is a man short..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Right, I’ll play myself. You might
learn something, Irishman. Two hundred
and fifty-one goals in two hundred and
seventy-four starts.

CLOUGH skillfully traps the ball between his feet, flips it
up onto this head – down onto his chest, then “WHAM” volleys
it into a distant goal..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Like to see Don fucking Revie do that,
eh?

CLOUGH removes his track suit trousers, rolls his neck. JIMMY
GORDON quickly divides the players into two teams, blows the
whistle..
(CO NTINU ED)

20
27 CON TINUE D: (4) 27

The game starts. CLOUGH, leading by example, anxious to prove
himself, is soon darting about, calling out…

CLOUGH (cont’d)
(clapping hands)
Here, son. To feet. Keep it simple.
Think and give. On the deck. Nice and
crisp. Yes, to me, Sniffer. To me.

CLARKE passes the ball. But it’s a fifty-fifty. Another
player bears down on CLOUGH..who refuses to pull out..

“CRUNCH”, a bone-shaking tackle from “BITES YER LEGS”.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Oh, Jeeeeeesussss!!!

CLOUGH is flattened. Rolls around on the floor. JIMMY GORDON
runs up to NORMAN HUNTER..
JIMMY
Fucking matter with you? He said no
fifty-fifty’s.

HUNTER aggressively steps forward. Nose to nose. He is
immediately flanked by other aggressive Leeds PLAYERS.
Crowding the referee. Intimidating him.

HUNTER
What are you going to do about it?
Book me?

JIMMY GORDON backs off, visibly frightened. CLOUGH lies on
the floor. In agony. Holding his knee.

28 INT. CORRIDOR OUTSIDE DRESSING-ROOMS – SAME TIME 28

CLOUGH listens to the PLAYERS laughing at him. Disrespecting
him. His face darkens.

BREMNER
(mimicking)
“Two hundred and fifty-one goals in
two hundred and seventy-four starts.”

The sound of coarse, cruel laughter among the LEEDS PLAYERS.
JIMMY GORDON appears, CLOUGH’s two SONS in tow..

JIMMY
I’ve got what you were looking for.

JIMMY holds up a large parcel wrapped in brown paper.
CLOUGH’s expression changes.

(CO NTINU ED)

21
28 CON TINUE D: 28

CLOUGH
What about the petrol?

JIMMY
In the boot of the car.

CLOUGH
Good lad.

29 INT. CORRIDOR – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 29

CLOUGH limps down a corridor. In a thunderous mood. Holding
the parcel. PEOPLE scatter.

30 INT. MANAGER’S OFFICE – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 30

The door flies open. CLOUGH storms into his office. He walks
over to the desk. DON REVIE’s desk.
He unwraps the parcel, and takes out an axe.

CLOUGH
Stand back.

CLOUGH’s SONS watch as their father violently swings the axe
down onto the desk. The sickening sound of splintering wood.

31 EXT. ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 31

CLOUGH watches the desk burn in a small bonfire outside.
MANNY CUSSINS and several DIRECTORS walk out.
They are surprised to see CLOUGH by the fire holding an
axe…

CUSSINS
Everything all right?

CLOUGH
(sunny, waving with the
axe)
Fine thank you, Mr. Cussins.

CLOUGH smiles politely, then turns, and walks to his car. The
DIRECTORS watch..

CUT TO:

22

32 INT. CLOUGH HOUSE – DINING-ROOM – DAY – (1968) 32

“Rrrriiinnnggg”, the phone rings. CLOUGH and his FAMILY are
having Sunday lunch. BARBARA CLOUGH looks up..

BARBARA
Not now, love – please?

“Rrrrriinnngggg”. The phone rings. CLOUGH tries to ignore it.

CLOUGH
But it might be Pete.

BARBARA
(rolls eyes)
Of course it’s Pete.

“Rrrriiinnngggg”, CLOUGH tries to eat, then..

CLOUGH
But it might be important.
(to NIGEL)
C’mon, eat your carrots. For your
Mother.

CLOUGH gets up. Walks out of the room..

33 INT. TAYLOR HOUSE – HALL – DAY – (1968) 33

PETER TAYLOR, similarly in disgrace with his family,
similarly unable to go a single Sunday lunch without calling
CLOUGH, whispers down the phone, terrified of his wife..

TAYLOR
You asked me to find a player with a
good head. Experience.
(whispering, furtive)
I’ve found one! He’s perfect. Dave
Mackay.

CLOUGH
Dave Mackay?!? He’s a hundred and
fucking fifty.

TAYLOR
I admit he’s not young.

CLOUGH
Not young? He’s old as fucking time!

TAYLOR
But he’s clever, keeps the ball well.
And passes it better than anyone
alive.
(CO NTINU ED)

23
33 CON TINUE D: 33

A voice calls from TAYLOR’s dining-room..

LILIAN (O.S.)
Pete…! That’s enough! Come back!

TAYLOR
(looks left and right)
He’s the one, Brian.

CLOUGH
You sure?

TAYLOR
Never been more sure of anything in my
life.

CLOUGH
All right, I’ll talk to Longson in the
morning.
TAYLOR
We haven’t got until morning. Hearts
have already made him an offer. Want
him as their manager. Apparently
they’ve already agreed terms.

CLOUGH
Well, what did you fucking call me for
then?

TAYLOR
Because when I asked Bill Nick how
done the deal was – he said ninety-
nine per cent.
CLOUGH’s face.

CLOUGH
Meaning he hasn’t signed.

TAYLOR
Exactly.

34 INT. CLOUGH’S HOUSE – DINING-ROOM – DAY – (1968) 34

BARBARA CLOUGH rolls her eyes, puts down her cutlery, and
calls out..

BARBARA
All right, Brian. Enough. Come back
now..

No answer. BARBARA tuts to herself. Gets up from the table.
She walks out of the dining-room, calling out..
(CO NTINU ED)

24
34 CON TINUE D: 34

BARBARA (cont’d)
C’mon, that’s enough…

35 INT. CLOUGH HOUSE – HALL – DAY – (1968) 35

..and into the hall. BARBARA stops. She looks left and right.
No sign.

BARBARA
Brian..? Love..?

36 OMITTED 36

37 EXT. ROADSIDE CAFE – DAY – (1968) 37

CLOUGH and TAYLOR emerge from a roadside cafe and walk
towards their car. They’ve missed Sunday lunch. So it’s
Crisps. Sweets. Fizzy drinks. Almost childlike. Happier in
one another’s company than with their own families.

CLOUGH
Where would we play him?

TAYLOR
In the middle of the park. Somewhere
he can see everything, use his loaf,
and tell the kids what to do.

CLOUGH
We’ll play him as a sweeper, then.

TAYLOR
(eating crisps)
Aye.

They climb into the waiting car…

CLOUGH
Won’t have to run about too much. And
what’s all this I hear about a tie
shop?

TAYLOR
He’s got a tie shop, hasn’t he? In
London. Which he spends two days a
week at.

CLOUGH starts the engine…

CLOUGH
Fucking tie shop?

(CO NTINU ED)

24A
37 CON TINUE D: 37

TAYLOR
It’s his “nest egg”. For the future.

(CO NTINU ED)

25
37 CON TINUE D: (2) 37

CLOUGH
No one’s going to be wearing fucking
ties in twenty years time.

CLOUGH and TAYLOR both giggle. Like kids. The car pulls
off…

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Hope his footballing brain is better
than his business brain.

38 EXT. MACKAY’S HOUSE – NORTH LONDON – DAY – (1968) 38

CLOUGH’s car pulls up outside a house in a quiet terraced
road in North London. TAYLOR checks it against the address on
a piece of paper. The two men get out of the car…

CLOUGH
You know it’s illegal. To sign someone
on the sabbath.

TAYLOR
Is it?
(immediately cautious)
Then perhaps we should just shake on
it today? And sign tomorrow?

CLOUGH
What? And let Hearts in again in the
morning? Fuck off.
(producing contracts)
I’m not leaving here without a
signature.
CLOUGH and TAYLOR walk up the garden path..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You’d bloody DO that, too – wouldn’t
you? Come all this way, then just
“shake hands”?
(shaking head)
Dear oh dear. What would you DO
without me?

TAYLOR
Hey, you would never have FOUND him if
it weren’t for me.

CLOUGH stops, rings the doorbell. Looks at TAYLOR.

CLOUGH
Good job we’re both wearing ties.

(CO NTINU ED)

26
38 CON TINUE D: 38

`Snap’, the door opens to reveal DAVE MACKAY, a thick set,
dark-haired bull of a man, with a thick Scots accent. CLOUGH
smiles ear to ear..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Jehova’s Witness, Dave! May the Lord
be with you!

MACKAY
Who the bloody hell are you?

CLOUGH
My name’s Brian Clough, and I once had
the pleasure of playing for England
against you in an Under-23 match.

MACKAY
I remember you now. You had a black
eye, a right bloody shiner.
(a beat)
And never stopped fucking talking!
What are you doing here?

CLOUGH
Come to talk to you about the Promised
Land, Dave. Land of Milk and Honey.
It’s a little place up the M1 called
Derby.
(a beat)
May we come in?

39 EXT. BASEBALL GROUND – PITCH – DAY – (1968) 39

CLOUGH, TAYLOR and JIMMY GORDON training with the Derby
PLAYERS. SAM LONGSON, (late 60’s), Chairman of Derby County
approaches, visibly angry..

UNCLE SAM
Dave Mackay??

CLOUGH
You don’t look happy, Uncle Sam.

UNCLE SAM
I’m not. What were you thinking? Going
over my head like that? Why didn’t you
call?

CLOUGH
Because you’d have said `no’.

(CO NTINU ED)

27
39 CON TINUE D: 39

UNCLE SAM
Bloody right I’d have said `no’. The
man’s bloody crocked.

CLOUGH
Pete reckons he’s good for three more
years.

UNCLE SAM
Is he fuck. He’s broken more bones
than Evel Knievel.

CLOUGH
Trust me, Mr. Chairman. It’s money
well spent.

LONGSON turns and double-takes….

UNCLE SAM
And who the FUCK are they?
CLOUGH
That’d be Messrs. McGovern and O’Hare.

MCGOVERN/O’HARE
Afternoon/Hello!

UNCLE SAM
(almost passing out)
Where did they come from?

CLOUGH
My old stomping grounds. Hartlepools
and Sunderland. Very reasonable, too.

CLOUGH smiles..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Just doing what’s best for the club.

UNCLE SAM
That’d be MY club, Brian. MY club.

40 EXT. BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 40

`Flash’, DAVE MACKAY, JOHN MCGOVERN and JOHN O’HARE wearing
Derby strip, poses under the Derby County sign for
photographs with CLOUGH and TAYLOR..

27A

41 EXT. PITCH – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1968) 41

CLOUGH and TAYLOR watch from the touchline as their new team
led by MACKAY plays in a match. CLOUGH watches in
admiration…

(CO NTINU ED)

28
41 CON TINUE D: 41

CLOUGH
You’re a genius, Pete. Bloody genius.
How did you see it?

On the training ground: DAVE MACKAY, barrel-chested and
older, voice like a bullhorn, is already bossing about the
young players, urging them to “think”..

TAYLOR
Dunno. It was just obvious. McGovern
in midfield, Mackay at the back,
O’Hare up front. The skewer isn’t it?
In the shish kebab.

CLOUGH watches MACKAY passing the ball, creating space..

CLOUGH
It’s beautiful. A thing of fucking
beauty!!
CLOUGH grabs TAYLOR’s head, kisses him. OVER THIS: we fade in
the roar from the crowd…

42 EXT. DUGOUT – CARLISLE – DAY – (1968) 42

CAPTION: `CARLISLE’

GOAL!! Derby score. CLOUGH and TAYLOR leap to their feet.

43 EXT. DUGOUT – BURY – DAY – (1968) 43

CAPTION: `BURY’
GOAL!! Derby score. CLOUGH and TAYLOR leap to their feet.

44 EXT. DUGOUT – HUDDERSFIELD – DAY – (1968) 44

CAPTION: `HUDDERSFIELD’

GOAL!! Derby score. CLOUGH and TAYLOR leap to their feet.

45 FLICKERING ARCHIVE FOOTAGE: – (1968) 45

Of DERBY winning the championship. Of NEWS STATIONS
announcing it in the Midlands.

46 INT. SAM LONGSON’S HOUSE – NIGHT 46

A large, swanky house, as befits the multi-millionaire owner
of a successful haulage business.
(CO NTINU ED)

29
46 CON TINUE D: 46

SAM LONGSON, BRIAN CLOUGH, PETER TAYLOR and DAVE MACKAY are
all celebrating with all their families.

The trophy is centre-stage. CLOUGH sings a Sinatra classic..

CLOUGH
“Love and marriage, love and marriage,
it’s an institute you can’t
disparage..”

To everyone’s amusement: CLOUGH sings to PETER TAYLOR, not
his own wife..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
“Try, try, try to separate them, it’s
an illusion. Try, try, try and you
will only come to this conclusion..”

In another corner: MACKAY is amiably ribbing LONGSON..
MACKAY
…”the man’s crocked”, “older than
time” “broken more bones than Evel
Knievel?”

LONGSON
All right, I admit it, I was wrong.

LONGSON starts eating his trademark felt hat. Much cheering
as he munches in disgust and swallows with difficulty.

Suddenly, DAVE MACKAY looks up, sees the television. Calls
for quiet!!

ON TV: a live awards presentation. From London. DON REVIE is
being presented with an award…

REVIE
..for Leeds to win the First Division
title, and for me to be named as
English Manager of the year…feels
like a dream come true…

CLOUGH watches. His expression changes. His eyes burn into
REVIE’s.

CLOUGH
You enjoy it, Don. Go home, put your
feet up and fucking enjoy it. There’s
a good lad. Because we’ll be in the
First Division next season. And we’re
going to have you!

Loud CHEERS from LONGSON, TAYLOR, MACKAY and CLOUGH. OVER
THIS: we fade in the sound of roaring…
(CO NTINU ED)

29A
46 CON TINUE D: (2) 46

CUT TO:

47 EXT. WEMBLEY STADIUM – DAY – (1974) 47

ARCHIVE TV FOOTAGE: Wembley Stadium on Charity Shield day.
The opening of the 1974/5 season.

COMMENTATOR’S VOICE
The twin towers of Wembley Stadium,
the cathedral of English football on a
glorious late-summer’s day… good
afternoon everyone, it’s the Charity
Shield, the opening Saturday of the
1974 season, and a first chance to get
a look at Brian Clough’s Leeds…

30

48 INT. WEMBLEY STADIUM – DAY – (1974) 48

DON REVIE is being interviewed by a TV JOURNALIST in
sheepskin coat and headphones..

JOURNALIST
Will you be supporting Leeds today,
Don?

REVIE
You’d expect nothing less having been
their manager for 13 years. But the
fact is I’m here today as manager of
England…

JOURNALIST
Do you have any advice to give your
successor, Brian Clough, before his
first game?
A mischievous smile barely perceptible of REVIE’s face..

REVIE
Win. The people of Leeds are used to
winning.

49 INT. WEMBLEY DRESSING-ROOM – DAY – (1974) 49

CLOUGH with the LEEDS TEAM in the dressing-room before kick
off. PLAYERS changing. The stink of Ralgex. PHYSIOS bandaging
the injured. JIMMY GORDON massaging one or two players.

CLOUGH
Right, the team for today is: Harvey
in goal, Reaney, Cherry, Bremner,
McQueen, Hunter, Lorimer, Clarke,
Jordan, Giles, Gray.

CLOUGH folds a piece of paper. A flicker of vulnerability.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Obviously all eyes will be on us to
see how things have changed. Without
Don. What might be different under me.
Let’s show them some of the things
we’ve been working on. Our changes in
attitude, too. Our new outlook. New
discipline. New approach.
(a beat)
Let’s see some of you playing with a
smile.

Team talk over: the PLAYERS put on their shoes. Make final
preparations.

30A

49A INT. TUNNEL – WEMBLEY – DAY – (1974) 49A

The two teams are limbering up in the tunnel. CLOUGH takes
his place ahead of BILLY BREMNER..

(CO NTINU ED)

31
49A CON TINUE D: 49A

CLOUGH
Of course, it goes without saying I’d
like you to continue as Club Captain.

Silence. BREMNER continues to limber up…

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You know, son, I’ve nothing but the
highest regard for you as a player.

They PLAYERS get the instruction to walk out, towards the
roar of the crowd…

CLOUGH (cont’d)
In fact, I wrote you a card saying as
much. Did you not get it? From
Majorca?

The roar of the CROWD grows louder…
CLOUGH (cont’d)
Saying how excited I was to be taking
this job. How much I thought we could
achieve together. And inviting you and
your family down to our place in Calla
Major any time you like?

BREMNER
Never got it.

They walk out into the ROAR of the crowd….

50 EXT. WEMBLEY STADIUM – DAY – (1974) 50
DON REVIE sits in the stadium watching as:

CLOUGH leads his Leeds PLAYERS out. 67,000 FANS screaming and
shouting.

A stony-faced BREMNER behind him.

51 EXT. WEMBLEY STADIUM – DAY – (1974) 51

CLOUGH’s face in close-up. Singing the National Anthem.

He sees REVIE in the crowd.

CLOUGH’s eyes.

REVIE’s eyes.

All around them, (ARCHIVE FOOTAGE) 67,000 belting out “God
Save The Queen”. But there might as well not be.
(CO NTINU ED)

31A
51 CON TINUE D: 51

It’s just REVIE and CLOUGH.

(CO NTINU ED)

32
51 CON TINUE D: (2) 51

ARCHIVE FOOTAGE: the National Anthem finishes. A great ROAR
goes up.

52 INT. COMMENTATOR’S BOX – WEMBLEY – DAY – (1974) 52

The game is underway. The T.V. match COMMENTATORS can hardly
believe what they are seeing, (we catch snippets of
FLICKERING ARCHIVE FOOTAGE on their monitors)…

COMMENTATOR
Kevin Keegan goes to ground….rolling
around on the pitch….that almost
looked like Johnny Giles’s fist made
contact with Kevin Keegan’s face…it
was!…the referee’s pulled out his
book…now a fight has broken out!

53 EXT. PITCH – DAY – (1974) 53
On the pitch: BREMNER and KEEGAN have started fighting..

COMMENTATOR (V.O.)
Billy Bremner of Leeds and Kevin
Keegan of Liverpool have come to
blows…

54 EXT. DUG-OUT – DAY – (1974) 54

CLOUGH watches from the dug-out. Unable to believe his eyes..

CLOUGH
For fuck’s sake..
COMMENTATOR (V.O.)
…the referee is talking to his
linesman..! He’s sending them off! The
referee is sending off both players..

55 EXT. PITCH – DAY – (1974) 55

BILLY BREMNER walks off, angrily removing his shirt..

56 EXT. WEMBLEY – DAY (1974) 56

ARCHIVE FOOTAGE: Liverpool lift the CUP aloft. Delirious
cheering from their FANS…

33

57 EXT. ROADSIDE – COUNTRY – DAY – (1974) 57

The Leeds coach had pulled up and the players are all having
a piss-break. Among them CLOUGH..

CLOUGH
(over his shoulder)
Because losing wasn’t enough, was it?
You only had to be the first
Englishman to be sent off at Wembley.

Our CAMERA widens to reveal BILLY BREMNER pissing in line
with NORMAN HUNTER and JOHNNY GILES..

BREMNER
(through gritted teeth)
Not fucking English.

CLOUGH
There I am making a big song and dance
to the media about our new approach.
Our new attitude. Our new ethics. And
you turn the place into fucking
Verdun. My CAPTAIN.

Silence. CLOUGH shakes himself dry.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
What am I going to do if they suspend
you? You’re my best player. I tell
you, I’ve a mind to fine you two weeks
wages!

BREMNER
You can’t do that! Mr. Revie always
paid all our fines.

CLOUGH
Well he’s not fucking here now, is he?

BREMNER
No, he’s not.

BREMNER, GILES AND HUNTER turn. Walks back towards the bus.

BREMNER (cont’d)
More’s the fucking pity.

CUT TO:

58 INT. REVIE’S OFFICE – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1969) 58

DON REVIE’s face: he watches through a window in Elland Road,
as….

34

59 EXT. CAR PARK – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1969) 59

The Derby Coach arrives. Hydraulic brakes HISSSSSSS. Doors
open. Boots, shoes, walk down steps.

BRIAN CLOUGH, PETER TAYLOR and the Derby Army disembark.
CLOUGH’s face: as he looks up at the writing on the side of
the stadium. LEEDS UNITED F.C.

60 INT. DRESSING-ROOM – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1969) 60

Some PLAYERS getting dressed. CLOUGH, TAYLOR and JIMMY GORDON
massaging others. Shin-pads. Water-bottles.

CLOUGH
Right, last time there was a whole
division between you and Leeds. Not
now. Not today. Today we’re here as
Second Division champions, and equals
with Leeds. John McGovern and Billy
Bremner, EQUALS. Kevin Hector and
Johnny Giles, EQUALS. Alan Hinton and
Peter Lorimer, John O’Hare and Paul
Madely. EQUALS. Now, c’mon, chins up.
Chests out. We can take this fucking
lot.

The PLAYERS clatter out, studs rattling down the tunnel, into
the roar of the CROWD..

CAPTION: LEEDS 5 – DERBY 0

61 INT. HOTEL/PUB – DERBY – NIGHT – (1969) 61
CLOUGH and TAYLOR in a deserted bar. Alone. A television
plays in the corner. DON REVIE’s face on TV…

DON REVIE (ON TV)
…obviously it’s a terrific
achievement for Derby, being promoted
to the First Division, but the truth
is Leeds United have an unfortunate
habit of reminding them just how far
they still have to go..

TAYLOR
Arrogant twat..

CLOUGH
But he’s right. Five nothing. They
made us look like fools today. And
what was John O’Hare doing? Letting
Madeley bully him like that.
(MO RE) (CO NTINU ED)

35
61 CON TINUE D: 61
CLO UGH (cont’d)
Push him around. Madeley’s half his
bloody size. O’Hare needs to toughen
up. He’s from Scottish dockyards,
isn’t he? And what about John
McGovern? He was useless in the
middle. Who’s idea was that?

TAYLOR
Yours.

CLOUGH
He was all over the place. Like the
Wandering Jew. Giving the ball to
anyone BUT his own. We need a ball
player, a natural in midfield. Who’ll
hold onto it. Keep possession. We’re
giving it away too easily.

TAYLOR
Someone like Colin Todd.
CLOUGH
(sharp intake)
Oooh, now you’re talking. Lovely pair
of feet.

TAYLOR
I’ve heard he wants out of Sunderland,
too. They’re all jumping ship up
there.

CLOUGH thinks for a moment, then…

CLOUGH
Well, go on then. Sign him.
TAYLOR
What? We can’t. Longson’s already told
us. Club’s in debt.

CLOUGH
Bollocks to that. I’ve not brought us
all the way to the First Division just
to sit there mid-table, and be cannon
fodder for sides like Leeds. Sign the
man.

TAYLOR
Hang on, hang on, careful…

CLOUGH
I’ll handle bloody Longson.

36

62 EXT. TRAINING GROUND – DERBY – DAY – (1972) 62

CLOUGH is working a session with the Derby PLAYERS. A car
screeches into the car park behind. A red-faced, apoplectic
SAM LONGSON gets out..

UNCLE SAM
A hundred and seventy grand?!? For
Colin fucking Todd?!?

CLOUGH
Correction, the ALMIGHTY Colin Todd.
The best technical footballer in the
country.

UNCLE SAM
A salary of three hundred quid a week?
You can’t pay a footballer that!!

CLOUGH
That’s the way things are going, Uncle
Sam. Football’s all about money now.

UNCLE SAM
I told you never to go over my head
again.

CLOUGH
Had no choice. Windows opened up. You
were in the bloody West Indies.

UNCLE SAM
WindowS? You mean there were others?!?

CLOUGH
Messrs. Gemmell and Hennessy.

Two PLAYERS turn and wave to LONGSON..

GEMMELL/HENNESSY
Afternoon!/Hello!

UNCLE SAM
(eyes popping/apoplectic)
For fucks SAKE!

CLOUGH
Let me ask you a question, Uncle Sam.
What did you come into football for?

UNCLE SAM
To support the football club in MY
HOME TOWN. The club I’ve supported ALL
MY LIFE.

(CO NTINU ED)

37
62 CON TINUE D: 62

CLOUGH
Well, I’m sure we all admire your
loyalty…

UNCLE SAM
What I DIDN’T come into it for was to
be lectured by a cocky little twat
from the North East.

CLOUGH
But the way I see it, there’s no point
being in this game unless you want to
beat the best, and be the best, and
that’s all the people of Derby want.
To see their team on top of the tree,
Derby, Derby Uber Alles, and if it’s
really their interest you have at
heart, not just impressing your
friends in the Director’s box, I
suggest you keep your eyes on your
road haulage business, keep your
opinions to yourself and start signing
some fucking cheques, there’s a good
lad. Leave the running of this
football club to the professionals.

UNCLE SAM
But professionals DON’T run the club,
Brian, the Chairman does. And if it’s
true, that football is all about
money, and that’s the way it’s going,
that’s suits us Chairmen just fucking
fine..because we’re the ones who’ve
got it.
SAM LONGSON lights a cigar, and walks off.

63 EXT. CAR PARK – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1972) 63

The Leeds coach pulls into the Derby car park. Doors open.
DON REVIE and SYD OWEN disembark.

Followed by the Leeds PLAYERS. Smoking. Side-burns. Long-
haired assassins one and all.

64 INT. CORRIDOR – SAME TIME – (1972) 64

CLOUGH and TAYLOR watch from an upstairs corridor window..

CLOUGH
See they’ve driven all the way into
the car park this time.

(CO NTINU ED)

38
64 CON TINUE D: 64

TAYLOR
It’s not a cup game, is it?

CLOUGH and TAYLOR look at one another, “Nutter”.

65 INT. DRESSING-ROOM – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1972) 65

An atmosphere of expectation and excitement.

Outside, the sound of the crowd. The sound of tannoy
announcements. CLOUGH goes to JOHN MCGOVERN..

CLOUGH
You know what your job is today?

MCGOVERN
Yes, Boss. Stay in position. Keep the
shape. “Stop being the Wandering Jew”.
CLOUGH
Good lad. And enjoy it. You deserve
to. You’ve worked hard this week.

CLOUGH moves to JOHN O’HARE.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Clear about what you’re doing today?

O’HARE
Be big. Be strong. Any chance I get,
flatten Paul fucking Madely.

CLOUGH
Good lad. He bullies you, you bully
him back. And near post for the
corners we worked on.

O’HARE
Yes, Boss.

CLOUGH moves to another PLAYER. (his new signing, COLIN TODD)

CLOUGH
Understand what I want from you today,
son?

TODD
(smiles)
I should, Mr. Clough. It’s simple
enough.

(CO NTINU ED)

39
65 CON TINUE D: 65

CLOUGH
Go on, let’s hear it.

TODD
“To be Colin fucking Todd, the best
technical footballer in the country.”

Laughter in the dressing-room.

CLOUGH
There, how could you forget that? Now
come on..
(clapping hands)
Up and at `em!

CLOUGH holds the door open, shaking each and every one of the
PLAYERS’ hands as they clatter out into the tunnel..

66 EXT. TOUCHLINE – DAY – (1972) 66
CLOUGH sits in his dug-out. While JIMMY GORDON and TAYLOR are
calling out instructions to the Derby players on the pitch…

CLOUGH stares at REVIE and his lieutenants in their
neighbouring dug-out.

Presently…CLOUGH’s view, and our frame is filled by two
wheel-chairs carrying disabled/learning difficulties FANS
wearing rosettes…

The wheel-chair FAN looks at CLOUGH for a beat, then
violently shakes a rattle…

WHEEL-CHAIR FAN
COME ON LEEDS!!!!!

CLOUGH’s face: shocked. Then, all of a sudden….

“RRRRROOOOOOOAAAAAARRRRRR”, a roar goes up. Goal Leeds. REVIE
and his henchmen leap to their feet, delighted. Applauding.

The WHEEL-CHAIR FAN screams with delight. Makes a `wanker’
gesture in CLOUGH’s face.

CLOUGH’s face: darkening like thunder.

67 INT. DRESSING-ROOM – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1972) 67

CAPTION: “HALF-TIME: DERBY 0, LEEDS 1”

The DERBY PLAYERS sit in the dressing-room. Shaking.
Terrified. Trying to hide, find shelter, find protection.

(CO NTINU ED)

40
67 CON TINUE D: 67

Already fearing the rocket they will get, the lash of his
tongue..

Presently, the door opens, and CLOUGH walks in, carrying a
bottle of brandy, Remy Martin.

CLOUGH
Congratulations, lads! Beautiful! That
was as perfect a half of terrible
football as I’ve ever seen. The plan
you’ve obviously been hatching to get
me the sack has worked a treat, so you
deserve a little celebration…

CLOUGH pours brandy into a tea-cup, gives it to a PLAYER..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You do want me to get the sack?

MCGOVERN
No, Boss.

CLOUGH
Then why the fuck did you give it to
their most dangerous player, Johnny
fucking Giles?

MCGOVERN
I didn’t see him.

CLOUGH turns to another PLAYER, (JOHN O’HARE), pours him a
shot of cognac…

CLOUGH
You want me to get the sack, Mr
O’Hare?

O’HARE
No, Boss.

CLOUGH
That open goal? Looked like a
deliberate fucking miss to me. A miss
to get your manager the sack.

CLOUGH turns to a third PLAYER, (COLIN TODD), hands him a
cup..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You do want me to get the sack, Mr.
Todd?

TODD
No.

(CO NTINU ED)

41
67 CON TINUE D: (2) 67

CLOUGH
No what?

TODD
No, Boss.

CLOUGH
The amount of bloody money I paid for
you, I must have been out of my mind.
You can’t even keep on your feet.

TODD
No, Boss.

CLOUGH turns, and faces the room.

CLOUGH
You’ve all done a terrific job of
getting me the sack. So I’m not
letting you out of here for the second
half, until you’ve finished the
bottle.

The PLAYERS stare at one another, holding their drinks.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
DRINK!!!

The PLAYERS nervously down their drinks. CLOUGH exits..

68 INT. TUNNEL OUTSIDE DRESSING-ROOM – DAY – (1972) 68

CLOUGH walks out to see PETER TAYLOR and JIMMY GORDON waiting
– who were listening through the door..
TAYLOR
You can’t do that!!

CLOUGH winks…

CLOUGH
Can’t I? Just you fucking watch me!!

CLOUGH storms off. PETER TAYLOR is left alone. Looks pale.
Momentarily holds his chest…

JIMMY
You all right?

TAYLOR
Yeah….fine.

TAYLOR indicates JIMMY’s cigarettes.

(CO NTINU ED)

41A
68 CON TINUE D: 68

TAYLOR (cont’d)
Giz a fag.

42

69 INT. TUNNEL – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1972) 69

The Derby PLAYERS run out, belching, watched and encouraged
by PETER TAYLOR…

JIMMY GORDON emerges from the dressing-room, holding the
empty bottle of Scotch…

JIMMY
(to TAYLOR)
Where’s he gone now?

70 INT. MANGER’S OFFICE – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1972) 70

CLOUGH pacing in his office. Unable to watch. Like an
expectant father.

Presently the building reverberates with a large…
RRRROOOAAAARRRRRRRRR.

A goal. But scored by whom? Derby or Leeds?

CLOUGH looks up at the clock. The clock on the wall shows
it’s 4.20.

Visibly anxious, CLOUGH starts pacing again. Presently,
another deafening…

RRRRROOOOOAAAAARRRRRRR

The building is almost brought to it’s foundations..

CLOUGH looks up. Desperate to know. Derby or Leeds?
But it’s only 4.35. Game still not over. Not by a long way.

CLOUGH carries on pacing. Walks from one side of the room to
the next. Left to right. Right to left.

Then, another stadium-shaking..

RRRRRROOOOOOAAAAAARRRRRR

CLOUGH looks up at the clock. 4.55.

This is intolerable. The game must be over now.

CLOUGH cannot bear it a moment longer. He opens the door.

43

71 INT. CORRIDORS – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1972) 71

CLOUGH walks down a corridor. Then runs. Then checks himself.
Slows down. Dignity. Dignity. But still walks as fast as he
can.

CLOUGH turns a corner to the dressing-rooms and the tunnel,
then sees PETER TAYLOR up ahead entering the tunnel from the
pitch with several Derby PLAYERS..

CLOUGH stops. TAYLOR looks up. Sees CLOUGH. Their eyes meet.
CLOUGH’s eyes. TAYLOR’s eyes.

Words are not necessary. TAYLOR’s smile says it all. CLOUGH
runs towards TAYLOR. The two men embrace.

CLOUGH
And..?

TAYLOR
2-1!!!

CLOUGH
Who scored?

TAYLOR
O’Hare. A brace. Oh, Brian, you should
have seen his first. Turns Bremner
inside out, nutmegs Madeley for good
measure. It was beautiful. You’d think
he’d been born in Rio de Janeiro, not
Aber-bloody-deen..

CLOUGH and TAYLOR walk off down the corridor.
TAYLOR (cont’d)
What made you go for the Brandy?

CLOUGH
They were just nervous. Shitting
themselves. You could tell.

TAYLOR
You’re a bloody genius. I tell you
what, Bri – if we can beat this lot,
we can go all the way.

44

72 A TELEPROMPTER RATTLES ACROSS OUR SCREEN: 72

Derby win against Ipswich Town – 1-0

73 DERBY FANS CELEBRATING 73

74 A TELEPROMPTER RATTLES ACROSS OUR SCREEN: 74

Derby win against Sheffield United – 4-0

75 DERBY FANS CELEBRATING 75

76 A TELEPROMPTER RATTLES ACROSS OUR SCREEN: 76

Derby beat Huddersfield Town – 3-0

77 DERBY FANS CHANTING 77

78 ARCHIVE TELEVISION FOOTAGE – (1972) 78

A NEWSREADER announces that Derby County have won the First
Division Championship.

78A INT. BASEBALL GROUND – CHANGING ROOM – DAY – (1972) 78A

The DERBY PLAYERS celebrate in a communal bath, holding the
trophy, drinking champagne. Spraying one another with water.

79 EXT. DERBY STREET – DAY – (1972) 79

CLOUGH, TAYLOR and ROY MACFARLAND hold aloft a large trophy,
travelling on board an open-top bus, through Derby. The whole
town has taken to the streets.

80 EXT. DERBY STREET – DAY – (1972) 80

CLOUGH, still celebrating, and still surrounded by PLAYERS
and FANS

CLOUGH
Derby County winning the championship
is a victory for decency, for honesty
and for football. Because they don’t
pull shirts, or nudge people in the
back in the box.
(MO RE)
(CO NTINU ED)

44A
80 CON TINUE D: 80
CLO UGH (cont’d)
They don’t protest every decision,
chop, hack or bully – unlike some
teams I could mention – beginning with
the letter `L’..

JOURNALISTS laugh…

CLOUGH (cont’d)
If you ask me, the best thing for
British football, the quickest way to
clean it up, would be fore dirty sides
like Leeds to be sent down for a spell
in Division Two.

45

81 EXT. REVIE’S HOME – LEEDS – DAY – (1972) 81

DON REVIE speaking to JOURNALISTS outside his home..

REVIE
I haven’t personally heard Mr.
Clough’s comments, but they have been
reported to me, and our solicitors are
looking into them. If I could offer
Mr. Clough some advice …I think he’d
be better off keeping his opinions to
himself…some of these allegations
against Leeds United and his fellow
professionals are an absolute
disgrace…

82 AND WE’RE INTO A QUICKFIRE MONTAGE OF: 82

CLOUGH appearing on half-a-dozen TV shows. Quick,
controversial, charismatic, witty. A natural media star, (we
intercut our actor with the genuine archive footage)

CLOUGH
Don Revie? Ooooh.
(shudders playfully)
Don’t mention that name to me.

DAVID FROST
It’s really like the other House of
Commons. You hate to mention him. Why?

CLOUGH
I hate to mention him why? Because
he’s a very talented man and I don’t
like him.

The audience laughs.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
He’s a very, very talented man and his
record is unsurpassable. But I just
happen not to like him. And I don’t
like the way he goes about football
either. Football is a game of opinion
and there are perhaps people in your
profession who don’t like the way you
do your bit.

DAVID FROST
Sure.

(CO NTINU ED)

45aA
82 CON TINUE D: 82

CLOUGH
And er… it makes the game go round.
Half the country don’t like a Labour
government. It just happens that the
other half do.

DAVID FROST (ON TV)
Why don’t you want me to ask why you
don’t like him?

CLOUGH (ON TV)
Because I can’t tell you. It’s
impossible. We’d get closed down,
David.

JOHN SADLER, pipe smoking football journalist, sits in a
television studio, (CALENDER)..

JOHN SADLER
Brian, you’ve been called big-headed,
arrogant, brash, the lot –

CLOUGH
By your profession, John, yeah.

JOHN SALDER
Sure. And a whole of it right too.

CLOUGH
And a whole lot of it wrong.

JOHN SALDER
Fine. I’ll concede that. So how would
you define your approach to
management, apart from being
brilliant?

All laugh.

CLOUGH
(laughing, rubbing eye)
Good lad. Thank you for the
compliment. It’s very, very difficult
when you get asked a question like
that.

DAVID COLEMAN, black and white footage, speaking into a
bakolite telephone..

COLEMAN (ON TV)
You’ve achieved something here that
most managers struggle for years to
achieve this. It’s come to you very
young. Are you surprised?

(CO NTINU ED)

45aB
82 CON TINUE D: (2) 82

CLOUGH sits at home, his SON on his lap.

(CO NTINU ED)

45A
82 CON TINUE D: (3) 82

CLOUGH
Suprised, David..but more than
surprised, delighted. It’s nice isn’t
it. For the good guys to win for once.

COLEMAN
Which for you was the most important
match to win and the best performance
from your point of view…

CLOUGH
Beating Leeds United, obviously.
Always a particular pleasure that.

COLEMAN
Brian, you’ve also done it on
comparatively small gates, which I
know has niggled you a little bit
during the season.
CLOUGH
Niggled me, David, it’s absolutely
made me blazing. To be honest, I know
what I want to achieve, I know what
the people of Derby want us to
achieve, but when you’ve got a
chairman not wanting to put his hand
in his pocket…

MICHAEL PARKINSON, the highest rating talk show on TV..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You ever see eighty five or perhaps
ninety percent of chairmen talking –
I’d love a few chairmen on your
programme occasionally – I believe the
very sight of them brings the game
into disrepute (some clap in the
audience). And every time they open
their mouths it kills it. Because the
very thing they’ve given me a lot of
stick about over the years – about
talking too much and going on
television too much, there are the
very people who can put two words
together and its rather embarrassing
to me that a man – or men – can stop
me talking to people like you. I love
football. It’s deep, it goes right
down through. It’s in every nerve,
vein, you name it. It consumes me. And
when I have to come and talk about I
like the passions of football to come
out. Because there are not enough in
the game.
(MO RE) (CO NTINU ED)

45AA
82 CON TINUE D: (4) 82
CLO UGH (cont’d)
I like a bit of the honesty, I like a
bit of the truth. I accept without any
shadow of a doubt that I talk too
much, apart from on this show.

Laughter.

PARKINSON (ON TV)
How do you react when someone says
“Boss, you’re doing it wrong?”

CLOUGH (ON TV)
I say, “How do you think it should be
done?” We talk about it for twenty
minutes, then we decide I was right.

BLACK AND WHITE ARCHIVE TV FOOTAGE OF MOHAMMED ALI

MOHAMMED ALI
..the world knows who I am. The world
knows I talk a lot.
(MO RE)

(CO NTINU ED)

46
82 CON TINUE D: (5) 82
MOH AMMED ALI (con t’d)
But there’s some fellow in London,
England named….”Brian Clough”…
(audience laughter)
Anyway I heard all the way in America,
They say he’s another Mohammed Ali.
Well, there’s just ONE Mohammed Ali. I
want you to know…
(jabbing finger)
Clough…you are not taking my job.
I’m the talker. Now, Clough…enough.
STOP IT!

83 INT – CLOUGH’S HOUSE – DERBY – DAY – (1973) 83

CLOUGH and TAYLOR, surrounded by FRIENDS and FAMILIES, with
flowers, telegrams, bottles of champagne, boxes of cigars.
Watching the Mohammed Ali on television.

TAYLOR
Are you going to stop it?

CLOUGH
No, I want to fight him!

They roar with laughter. Cheers and celebration. Everyone
roughing up CLOUGH’s hair, patting him on the back.

CUT TO:

84 INT. FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION HQ – LONDON – DAY – (1974) 84

The QUEEN’s face. Full-frame. Beside her PRINCE PHILIP.
A portrait of Her Majesty the Queen and HRH the Duke of Kent
hangs on an oak-pannelled wall: the Patron and the President
of the Football Association..

Beneath the portrait: a long table in a boardroom. An austere
six-man disciplinary committee of the FA. Blazers and
buttons. Whiskers and power.

Aldermen, Freemasons, Generals, white-hair and golden
buttons. Admirals, Presidents and Vice-Presidents.

Sitting in front of the committee…

BILLY BREMNER and BRIAN CLOUGH. Like schoolchildren..

(CO NTINU ED)

47
84 CON TINUE D: 84

COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
William Bremner, your conduct in the
Charity Shield match was deplorable
and cannot be tolerated.

CLOUGH
It was.

COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
We understand Leeds are taking
disciplinary action against you
internally, however the Football
Association has to be seen to make an
example. We have therefore decided to
impose a fine of five hundred pounds..

CLOUGH’s face: a victorious look.

CLOUGH
Thank you..
COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
…and a suspension until September
30th…

“Bang”, he brings down a gavel. CLOUGH’s face: the smile
fades..

CLOUGH
(disbelieving laugh)
What? September 30th? That’s more than
a month? Thats six bloody weeks??

COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN
I’ll make it seven if you carry on
with language like that..

CLOUGH
C’mon, double the fine. Treble it.
Anything. Don’t suspend him for that
long. He’s my Captain. The best player
I’ve got.

The COMMITTEE MEMBERS get to their feet and walk out.

(CO NTINU ED)

47A
84 CON TINUE D: (2) 84

CLOUGH’s face: OVER THIS: the sound of a ringing phone. The
sound of a familiar voice at the other end..

TAYLOR (O.S.)
Hello?

85 INT. DRAGONARA HOTEL – CLOUGH’S ROOM – NIGHT – (1974) 85

CLOUGH in his cheap hotel-room. PETER TAYLOR’s voice the
other end..

(CO NTINU ED)

48
85 CON TINUE D: 85

CLOUGH
I suppose you’ve heard!

86 INT. TAYLOR’S HOUSE – SAME TIME – (1974) 86

TAYLOR freezes, hearing the voice, (we intercut as necessary
for the remainder of the call)..

TAYLOR
God…what time is it?

CLOUGH
Suspended for eleven bloody games!!

TAYLOR
I know. You’re buggered. Billy
Bremner’s the heart and soul of that
team.
CLOUGH
Plus Mike Jones and Eddie Gray are
injured.

TAYLOR
Like I said. You’re buggered.

CLOUGH
What do I do, Pete? I need new
players. Tell me who to buy.

TAYLOR
No, Brian.

CLOUGH
Help me. C’mon, we’ll sort this place
out together. You and me. Turn it
around.

TAYLOR
It’s too late. I’d have helped you
once. But not now. Not after what was
said. We’re on our own now. Each man
for himself. Remember?

(CO NTINU ED)

49
86 CON TINUE D: 86

“Click”, TAYLOR hangs up. CLOUGH stares at the receiver.

86A OMITTED 86A

86B OMITTED 86B

49A

87 EXT. CAR PARK – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1974) 87

The same sign as earlier.

“MR. D. MACKAY – MANAGER”.

CLOUGH stares at the sign as he parks his car in the space
beside it. A stab in his heart.

88 INT. BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1974) 88

CLOUGH walks along a corridor. Sees the PLAYERS training
outside. HIS players. DERBY players.

To one side, MCGOVERN and O’HARE. CLOUGH looks out at them.
He winks, discreetly at them. They look back, and nod.

Then get back to work.
The sound of laughter. The camaraderie of a family. What a
contrast to Leeds.

CLOUGH walks along a corridor with photos on the wall. Framed
photos of HIS victories.

HIS club. HIS family. HIS home.

89 INT. MANAGER’S OFFICE – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1974) 89

CLOUGH walks into the office to see DAVE MACKAY behind his
desk. Who gets to his feet. Extends his hand.

MACKAY
Well, look who it is! Come to raid my
larder? Or just missing the place?

CLOUGH
McGovern and O’Hare. I’ve spoken to
them on the phone. They want to come
and play for me.

(CO NTINU ED)

50
89 CON TINUE D: 89

MACKAY
Aye, and you can have `em. A hundred
and fifty thousand pound for the pair.

CLOUGH
Cheeky sod! They’re not worth a penny
more than seventy.

MACKAY
But you’re desperate now, aren’t you?
Having lost to Stoke and Birmingham..
(a beat)
All, right, since it’s you..I’ll knock
ten grand off.

CLOUGH
Give you a hundred grand.

MACKAY
One thirty. Final offer.
CLOUGH is about to explode, then..

CLOUGH
All right. Done.

The two MEN shake hands. Barely.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
So? Enjoying yourself?

MACKAY
Two wins from two. What’s not to
enjoy? You?
CLOUGH
Loving it. Different class, Leeds.
Proper club. BIG club.

MACKAY
Demand results there, though, Brian.

CLOUGH
Hey, it’s `Boss’ to you.

MACKAY
Not any more.

CLOUGH
I bought you when you were crocked,
you fat bastard. And gave you the two
best years of your career. It will
always be `Boss’ to you.

(CO NTINU ED)

51
89 CON TINUE D: (2) 89

CLOUGH walks to the door. He turns, and indicates the desk.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Ever tempted to burn that bloody desk?
Chop it up and burn it?

MACKAY
Why would I do that?

CLOUGH
Exorcise the bloody place. Get rid of
me.

MACKAY
Why? You’re not here anymore, are you?
Be a waste of a perfectly good desk.

90 EXT. MOTORWAY – DAY – (1974) 90
CLOUGH driving his car. Clenching the steering wheel in fury.

CLOUGH
Fucking Scot.

91 INT. DRAGONARA HOTEL – BAR – DAY – (1974) 91

It’s late: JIMMY GORDON with CLOUGH in the bar..

JIMMY
McGovern and O’Hare? Can’t believe he
actually sold them to you. It must be
true, then..
CLOUGH
What?

JIMMY
The rumour that he’s after buying
Duncan Mackenzie. It’s why he needs
the money.

CLOUGH
Who’s Duncan Mackenzie?

OVER THIS: the sound of a ringing phone…

92 OMITTED 92

52

93 OMITTED 93

94 EXT/INT. VICTORIA HOTEL – SHEFFIELD – DAY – (1974) 94

DUNCAN MACKENZIE, long-haired, chain-smoking, bemused, stands
in the lobby of the hotel. OVER THIS: we hear…

CLOUGH (O.S.)
Is that Duncan Mackenzie?

MACKENZIE (O.S.)
Yes. This is he.

CLOUGH (O.S.)
Now listen to me. You go get your coat
and your skates on because you’re
coming to meet me at the Victoria
Hotel in Sheffield in half and hour.
And Duncan?
MACKENZIE (O.S.)
Yes, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH (O.S.)
Bring a bloody pen, because you’re
signing for Leeds United today.

95 INT. BAR – VICTORIA HOTEL – SHEFFIELD – DAY – (1974) 95

`Pop’, a WAITER uncorks champagne, pours it into glasses.
CLOUGH and his three sheepish new signings: MCGOVERN, O’HARE
and DUNCAN MACKENZIE sit uneasily in the bar.
CLOUGH
Congratulations, lads!! My first
signings for Leeds. My Leeds United.
Playing with flair and winning with
honour. Winning the `right’ way. And
winning the admiration of fans all
over Europe because…

MCGOVERN
Because of the way we play.

(CO NTINU ED)

53
95 CON TINUE D: 95

CLOUGH
Because of the way we play!!!

MACKENZIE lights a cigarette..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
We’re going all the way, lads. Inter
Milan, Barcelona. We’re going to win
silverware Don Revie could only dream
of.

MCGOVERN/O’HARE
Yes, Boss.

CLOUGH
And you, Mr. Mackenzie, you scored
twenty-eight goals last season. You’ll
score me twenty-nine goals this.

MACKENZIE
Yes, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH
Do you know how many goals I scored
before I got injured?

MACKENZIE
I’m sorry, Mr. Clough. I don’t.

CLOUGH
Two hundred and fifty-one.

MCGOVERN and O’HARE privately exchange looks, “Here goes”.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Do you know how many games it took me?

MACKENZIE
I’m sorry, Mr. Clough, I don’t.

CLOUGH
Have a guess. Go on…

O’HARE mouths “Two hundred and seventy-four”..

MACKENZIE
Three hundred?

MCGOVERN closes his eyes, “Moron.”

(CO NTINU ED)

54
95 CON TINUE D: (2) 95

CLOUGH
Two hundred and seventy-four! Now what
do you think about that?

MACKENZIE
Is that a record, Mr. Clough?

CLOUGH
(rolling eyes)
`Course it’s a bloody record.

CLOUGH shoots a look to the others..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You know what ELSE you lot can do
that’s even more important? You can be
my eyes and ears in that dressing
room.

MACKENZIE/O’HARE
Yes, Mr. Clough/Yes, Boss

CLOUGH
Need to know what they say about me.
Who’s making trouble. Who the
ringleaders are.

MACKENZIE
Yes, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH
Want you to help me clear this place
out. Make it MY team, understand. OUR
team. Clean it up and clear it out
once and for all.
MACKENZIE
Yes, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH indicates MACKENZIE’s drink..

CLOUGH
Now c’mon, drink up. We’re off to meet
the press.

MACKENZIE
Yes, Mr. Clough.

MACKENZIE knocks back his champagne..

CLOUGH
And Duncan..?

MACKENZIE
Yes, Mr. Clough?
(CO NTINU ED)

55
95 CON TINUE D: (3) 95

CLOUGH
It’s “Boss” from now on. There’s a
good lad.

MACKENZIE
Yes, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH sighs and goes. MCGOVERN and O’HARE roll their eyes.
MACKENZIE stubs his cigarette, and hurries after them..

96 EXT. ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 96

“Flash”, photographs are being taken by PRESS of the three
new signings, DUNCAN MCKENZIE, JOHN O’HARE and JOHN MCGOVERN,
all wearing Leeds shirts.

PULL BACK TO REVEAL: they are being watched from a distance
by several Leeds SENIOR players..

97 INT. ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 97

CLOUGH walks through a corridor, brushing past JOHNNY GILES,
BILLY BREMNER and several other SENIOR PLAYERS. An
intimidating atmosphere..

BREMNER
What the hell did you buy them for?
Waste of bloody money.

CLOUGH
Duncan Mackenzie scored twenty-eight
goals last season. John O’Hare and
John McGovern are both internationals.
GILES
We’ve got two strikers, Alan Clarke
and Mick Jones, they’re
internationals, too.

CLOUGH
And one’s injured and the other’s
fucking suspended.

BREMNER
Maybe if you spent a little more time
here on the training ground with us,
you wouldn’t need to buy Derby
“rejects”.
(a beat)
We’ve a game Saturday. Against Queens
Park Rangers. Or had you forgotten?

(CO NTINU ED)

56
97 CON TINUE D: 97

CLOUGH
I haven’t forgotten.

GILES
Well, you haven’t told us a single
thing about how QPR will play. Mr
Revie would have files and dossiers
prepared. Had the reserves playing the
Rangers way all week. Had the first
team looking out for this and that.

CLOUGH
Bollocks to Mr. Revie! You’re
professional footballers. Stop Stan
Bowles! That’s all you need to know
about QPR. And I don’t have to justify
myself to you. Not how or when I
conduct training. Not who I buy or
pick to play.
GILES
No. Not to us. But come Saturday
afternoon, there’ll be 40,000 people
here who you DO have to justify
yourself, to.

GILES, BREMNER et al walk off. CLOUGH left, staring.

OVER THIS: a large RRRRROOOAAARRRR. GOAL.

98 INT. LEEDS DRESSING-ROOM – DAY – (1974) 98

The LEEDS PLAYERS trudge in, after the game. Angry. Heads
hung low. Begin to strip off.
CAPTION: “QPR 1, Leeds 0.”

CLOUGH enters. Visibly gutted by the result, but now’s not
the time to show it..

CLOUGH
Sorry, lads.

CLOUGH walks round the dressing-room, shaking hands
individually, patting PLAYERS on the back…

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You were robbed out there today. Broad
bloody daylight. That was never a
penalty.

CLOUGH’s tone is sensitive. Tactful. Considerate.

(CO NTINU ED)

56A
98 CON TINUE D: 98

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Stan Bowles? Diving like that? Man’s
a disgrace..

But several of the LEEDS PLAYERS refuse his hand. Or freeze
at his touch. Turn away from him..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
I’ve spoken to the referee already.
Given him a piece of my mind. And come
Monday morning, mark my word, I shall
be taking this further…

The LEEDS PLAYERS stare at one another. Shoot one another
looks.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Anyway, I want you all to know, I’m
not in the slightest bit critical of
your performance today. Not a bit of
it. You were terrific out there…

(CO NTINU ED)

57
98 CON TINUE D: (2) 98

NORMAN HUNTER spits in contempt. GILES turns and walks out,
into the showers.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
I couldn’t ask for more effort.
Commitment.
(tailing off)
Passion.

The LEEDS PLAYERS follow. Finally O’HARE and MCGOVERN, too.

A deathly silence. CLOUGH is left alone in the dressing-room.

OVER THIS: the sound of a ringing telephone. A gruff VOICE
answers..

REVIE (V.O.)
Hello?

98A INT. CLOUGH’S ROOM – DRAGONARA HOTEL – NIGHT 98A

It’s the middle of the night. CLOUGH speaks into the phone,
visibly the worse for wear from alcohol…

CLOUGH (V.O.)
You must be loving this. Loving every
minute.

98B INT. REVIE’S HOUSE – BEDROOM – NIGHT – (1974) 98B

DON REVIE’s face, half-asleep. Visibly irritated. He sits up
in bed. A stout Yorkshire matron wakes beside him.
REVIE
Who is this?

CLOUGH
Watching it all fall apart. It’s Brian
Clough.

REVIE
What?

CLOUGH
They won’t play for me. Your boys.
Your bastard sons. And never will.

REVIE
Are you drunk, man? It’s two in the
morning. What do you want? Why are you
ringing me here?

57A

98C INT. DRAGONARA HOTEL – NIGHT – (1974) 98C

CLOUGH
They’re loyal to you. Thought you’d
like to know that. Loyal to Big Daddy
Don..

REVIE
For God’s sake go to sleep. Where’s
you dignity, man? And don’t call here
again.

“Click”, REVIE hangs up. CLOUGH stares at the receiver.

99 OMITTED 99

100 EXT. CAR PARK – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1973) 100

The Leeds Coach arrives at Derby. Hydraulic brakes
hissssssss. Doors open. Boots, shoes, walk down steps.

DON REVIE, SYD OWEN and the Leeds PLAYERS disembark.

HARVEY, REANEY, CHERRY, BREMNER, HUNTER, LORMIER, CLARKE,
JORDAN, GILES, GRAY walk towards the Derby dressing-rooms..

101 INT. BOARDROOM – BASEBALL GROUND – SAME TIME – (1973) 101

SAM LONGSON stands by the window, looking out into the car
park. He sees the Leeds United PLAYERS. Reads their mood.

(CO NTINU ED)

58
101 CON TINUE D: 101

Their faces. Their focus. Their murderous intent.

A flicker of concern on SAM LONGSON’s face. He thinks, then
calls out to his SECRETARY..

LONGSON
Get me today’s team sheet, will you?

He lets the curtain fall..

102 INT. CORRIDOR – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1973) 102

SAM LONGSON walks through corridors of Elland Road, carrying
the team sheet. Walking towards the dressing-rooms. He turns
a corner and runs into CLOUGH..

CLOUGH
What’s up, Uncle Sam? Bit below stairs
for you here, isn’t it? Taken a wrong
turn somewhere?

LONGSON
Just seen the team sheet. Hinton,
O’Hare, Todd, Mackay.
(looks left and right)
That’s our strongest side.

CLOUGH
Of course it’s our strongest side.
It’s Leeds United. Would you prefer I
sent out the apprentices?

LONGSON
We’re at Juventus mid-week. Semi-final
of the European Cup. Biggest night in
the club’s history!! Couldn’t you just
field…

CLOUGH
What?

LONGSON
Y’know…

CLOUGH
A weaker side? Am I hearing right? Is
the CHAIRMAN of this football club
seriously asking his manager to LOSE?

LONGSON
You know what I mean..

CLOUGH
Against their biggest rivals?
(CO NTINU ED)

59
102 CON TINUE D: 102

LONGSON
The Chairman of this football club is
asking his manager to be pragmatic.
Manage his resources. Prioritise.
We’ve embarked on a huge program of
refurbishment and improvements. New
stands. Better floodlights. We need a
good run in Europe to pay for it.

CLOUGH
I’m going to pretend I didn’t hear a
word of this.

CLOUGH turns to walk away. LONGSON calls after him..

LONGSON
(checking watch)
We’ve still got twenty minutes before
kick-off. I’d reconsider if I were
you. I wouldn’t want my employer to be
unhappy..

CLOUGH
My employer?

LONGSON
Chairman of Derby County. And Chairman
LONG before you ever showed up.

CLOUGH
That’s right. You were Chairman of
Derby County before I came here. I
remember that. When Derby County were
at the fucking foot of the Second
Division, when nobody had heard of
them for twenty years and nobody had
heard of Sam bloody Longson ever. Full
stop. And that’s where you’d still
fucking be if it wasn’t for me; at the
foot of the bloody Second Division,
where nobody remembered you and nobody
had heard of you. There would BE no
Derby County without me, no league
title, no Champions of England; not
without Brian Clough.

A door opens and PETER TAYLOR walks out in time to hear…

LONGSON
I’m going to give you some good
advice, Brian Clough.
(MO RE)

(CO NTINU ED)

60
102 CON TINUE D: (2) 102
LON GSON (cont’d)
No matter how good you think you are,
or how clever, or how many fancy new
friends you make on the telly, the
reality of footballing life is this:
the Chairman is the boss, then come
the directors, then the secretary,
then the fans, then the players, and
finally, last of all, bottom-of-the-
heap, lowest of the low, the one in
the end we can all without, is the
bloody manager.

LONGSON turns and storms off. TAYLOR looks at CLOUGH..

TAYLOR
What have you done now?

CLOUGH doesn’t answer, and storms off in the opposite
direction. TAYLOR is left alone, visibly anxious.

103 EXT. PITCH – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1973) 103

CLOUGH watches from the touch-line as the game is in
progress. “CRASH”, a Leeds PLAYER scythes into a Derby
PLAYER. “BEEEP”, the referee blows his whistle. CLOUGH and
leaps off his bench in fury. Shouting abuse..

CLOUGH
You’re a bloody disgrace! You should
be in the book for that, Cherry!

“BEEEP”, the referee blows his whistle. REVIE smiles to
himself as a Derby PLAYER is carried off on a stretcher.
CLOUGH (cont’d)
You’re an animal. A fucking animal,
Hunter!

SAM LONGSON watches from the director’s box. He closes his
eyes. PETER TAYLOR witnesses this..

“CRUNCH”, another brutal tackle, another whistle. Another
Derby PLAYER hobbles off the pitch. Blood streaming from a
cut to his head..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
I’ll see you in fucking court,
Lorimer!

CLOUGH’s eyes meet REVIE’s eyes along the touchline.

60A

104 EXT. PITCH – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1973) 104

Afterwards: the LEEDS and DERBY players file off the pitch.
BREMNER brushes roughly past CLOUGH…

(CO NTINU ED)

61
104 CON TINUE D: 104

BREMNER
(under his breath)
Good luck in Europe..

CLOUGH turns, `What?” BREMNER, GILES, HUNTER, LORIMER carries
on walking down the tunnel. Laughing to themselves..

CLOUGH is joined by TAYLOR and JIMMY GORDON.

105 INT. DERBY DRESSING-ROOM – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY – (1973) 105

Afterwards: the Derby dressing-room looks like the Emergency
Room at a hospital..

Casualties. Blood. Stitches. Swellings. At least half-a-dozen
PLAYERS are injured. Some on stretchers.

CLOUGH stares in horror at the wreckage from the doorway. SAM
LONGSON appears beside him. Stares at CLOUGH..
LONGSON
You fucking idiot.

LONGSON turns and walks away. CLOUGH turns to survey the
carnage in the dressing-room. Like a battlefield.

CLOUGH’s eyes meet TAYLOR’s.

106 ARCHIVE TELEVISION NEWS FOOTAGE 106

The most important night in Derby’s history as the Derby
players arrive in Turin to play against mighty Juventus..

107 INT. CLOUGH HOUSE – NIGHT – (1973) 107

BARBARA CLOUGH and the children. Huddled together round the
television. Eating supper. Watching the Juventus game on TV.

BARBARA
There’s Dad, look!

BARBARA and the KIDS watch intently. But JUVENTUS score one
goal. Then another. The final whistle. JUVENTUS win 3-1.

BARBARA (cont’d)
Pity.

BARBARA gets to her feet…

BARBARA (cont’d)
All right. Bed time! Everyone clean
your teeth!
(CO NTINU ED)

62
107 CON TINUE D: 107

SON
Wait..! Look..!

ON TV: CLOUGH is in the tunnel. Speaking to a television
REPORTER.

CLOUGH (ON TV)
Disappointed? Not a bit. My players
were heroic out there tonight.
Effectively we were playing the
Italian champions with a reserve team.
That many of our first team are
injured…

108 INT. TUNNEL – JUVENTUS – NIGHT 108

CLOUGH continues. PETER TAYLOR stands beside him, visibly
pale, stressed…
CLOUGH
…it’s what happens if you have a
Chairman who authorizes a multi-
million pound refurbishment of the
director’s box and hospitality suites
before he pays for a proper squad.
Suppose it depends on your priorities.
Players or prawn sandwiches? I know
which I’d prefer. I know which honest,
working class Derby supporters would
prefer, too..

A commotion breaks out. TV JOURNALISTS ask questions, sensing
a great story. CLOUGH continues answering as, beside him,
(unseen by anyone else)…
…TAYLOR is white-faced, holding his chest.

CUT TO:

109 INT. DRESSING-ROOM – DAY – (1974) 109

CLOUGH pouring brandy into a glass. DUNCAN MACKENZIE, JOHN
O’HARE, and JOHN MCGOVERN sit in front of him. Visibly
uncomfortable.

MCGOVERN
Billy Bremner, Boss.

(CO NTINU ED)

63
109 CON TINUE D: 109

CLOUGH
Who else?

MCGOVERN
Norman Hunter.

CLOUGH
Who else?

MCGOVERN
Eddie Gray.

CLOUGH
Who else?

MCGOVERN
Peter Lorimer.

CLOUGH
What are they saying?
This falls to MACKENZIE, who knocks back his drink. Trembling
hands. Dutch courage.

MACKENZIE
That you’re never here.
(a beat)
That they’re worried about the future.
(a beat)
That you’re just going to fill the
place with more Derby players.

MCGOVERN
And that all thing’s considered they
were all a lot happier under…
CLOUGH
Under who?

MCGOVERN dries. Cannot find the words..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Don Revie?

(CO NTINU ED)

64
109 CON TINUE D: (2) 109

MACKENZIE, MCGOVERN, O’HARE avoid his eyes..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Is that what they say?

MCGOVERN
Yes, Boss.

CLOUGH
That he’s the boss? The Guvnor? The
Capi di Tutti Fucking Capi?

MCGOVERN
Yes, Boss.

O’HARE
And that they miss the bingo.

CLOUGH
The bingo?
MCGOVERN
And the carpet bowls.

CLOUGH
Carpet bloody bowls?

MCGOVERN
It helps them relax before a game.

MCGOVERN and O’HARE stare at one another..

O’HARE
That it, Boss? Can we go now?
CLOUGH stares, lost in thought: the three PLAYERS go. The
door closes. CLOUGH is left alone.

Then he gets up, and in a terrifying flash of rage, picks up
his glass and throws it against the wall..

110 EXT. CAR PARK – DAY – (1974) 110

CLOUGH walks out into the car park, then he stops in his
tracks when he sees..

JOHNNY GILES, BILLY BREMNER and NORMAN HUNTER (among others),
with their GIRLFRIENDS and WIVES and KIDS, being shown brand
new cars by a SPONSOR.

CLOUGH takes JIMMY GORDON aside..

CLOUGH
What’s all this?
(CO NTINU ED)

65
110 CON TINUE D: 110

JIMMY
Club cars. Complimentary for the
senior payers. Brand new.

CLOUGH sees BREMNER, GILES and HUNTER trying out the sports
cars. His smile fades. He walks up to the REP from the CAR
FIRM..

CLOUGH
Nice to meet you, pet. Now, you can
take your lovely sports cars, and put
`em back on your transporter..

REPRESENTATIVE
What?

BREMNER
What are you talking about? These are
ours!
CLOUGH
You’ll have complimentary cars when
you deserve a compliment. Right now
you don’t deserve a complimentary
bicycle between you.

CLOUGH takes the KEYS and gives them to the REPRESENTATIVE..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Complimentary cars when you’re not
suspended..
(indicates BREMNER)
…and when you lot start winning some
games..
(indicated GILES and
HUNTER)

CLOUGH goes back to his own car..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
If I had my way, you’d WALK to the
ground and back every game..

CLOUGH gets into his car, and roars out, past glowering
BREMNER, glowering GILES, glowering HUNTER, glowering
GIRLFRIENDS and WIVES.

111 EXT. CLOUGH HOUSE – NIGHT – (1974) 111

CLOUGH’s car pulls up outside his house in Derby. He closes
his eyes. Breathes a private sigh of relief. Home. At last.

Safe. Surrounded by people who love him.

65A

112 INT. CLOUGH HOUSE – NIGHT – (1974) 112

CLOUGH walks into his house.

(CO NTINU ED)

66
112 CON TINUE D: 112

BARBARA
What are you doing here? Aren’t you
supposed to be in that hotel in Leeds?

CLOUGH
I couldn’t stand it for another night.

CLOUGH takes off his coat…

BARBARA
What? So you drove all the way? What
time will you have to get up in the
morning…

CLOUGH
Half five.

CLOUGH bends down. Kisses his wife.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You smell nice.

BARBARA
Do I?

CLOUGH
Forgotten what a woman smells like.

BARBARA strokes his head.

BARBARA
Not like bloody men. That’s for sure.

113 OMITTED 113

114 INT. SONS’ BEDROOM – CLOUGH HOUSE – NIGHT – (1974) 114

CLOUGH looks into his SONS’ room. The eldest is fast asleep,
but the youngest says, `Dad?’

CLOUGH
You still awake? You should be asleep.

NIGEL
Tell us a joke, Dad?

(CO NTINU ED)

67
114 CON TINUE D: 114

CLOUGH
A joke? All right. There’s this bloke
walking about in London, when all of a
sudden, the city gets hit by a Russian
`A’ bomb. Booooooooom.

CLOUGH sits down, strokes his son’s head..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
And all the buildings have fallen
down. And all the people are dead. And
now this bloke is the only man left in
the whole of London.

CLOUGH continues stroking his son’s hair..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
And he suddenly feels very, very
lonely because there’s no one else to
talk to. Nobody else but him.
CLOUGH’s SON falls asleep. CLOUGH doesn’t notice..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
So he decides that he’s had enough,
that he can’t bear being this lonely,
and so he climbs up to the top of the
one building still standing. The Post
Office Tower. And then he jumps off.
And he’s falling down, down and down
and down, the sixteenth floor, the
fifteenth floor, the fourteenth, and
that’s when he hears the phone
ringing…
CLOUGH looks down. And gets two unexpected shocks.

The first is that his SON is already asleep. The second is,
there is a tear running down his own cheek.

115 INT. TUNNEL – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 115

The LEEDS PLAYERS clatter off the pitch. Covered in mud.
Walking in silence. No smiles. Heads hung low..

CAPTION: “LEEDS 0 – MANCHESTER CITY 2. LEEDS ARE NOW FOURTH
FROM BOTTOM”

JIMMY GORDON is waiting for CLOUGH..

JIMMY
The Chairman wants to see you. Said it
was important. Right away.

(CO NTINU ED)

67A
115 CON TINUE D: 115

CLOUGH’s face: already fearing the worst.

68

116 INT. CORRIDOR OUTSIDE BOARDROOM – DAY – (1974) 116

CLOUGH walks along the corridor. Past the photographs on the
wall. The trophies in the cabinets. The pictures of a smiling
DON REVIE – mocking him.

CLOUGH shoots his cuffs. Rolls his neck. A boxer on his way
to the ring. A gladiator on his way to the circus.

He knocks on the door, and walks in. MANNY CUSSINS, SAM
BOLTON and a third man. A stranger.

BOLTON
About bloody time.

CUSSINS
Where you been? I was about to send
out a search party.

CLOUGH
Look, Mr. Cussins, I know it’s not
been the best of starts, but in my
defence, there are a couple of things
I’d like to say…

CUSSINS
This is Martin Hughes. He runs
Mercedes here in the North.

CLOUGH
(double-takes)
What?

CUSSINS
We hear that’s what you like to drive.
A Mercedes?

CLOUGH
It’s..what I used to drive at Derby.
Yes.

CUSSINS
Well, we can’t have Leeds United being
outdone by Derby County, can we? So
Martin here is going to take you over
to his showroom and get you sorted
out.

They begin to walk to the door. CUSSINS puts his arm round
CLOUGH…

(CO NTINU ED)

69
116 CON TINUE D: 116

CUSSINS (cont’d)
Also we figured if you were sitting in
a spanking new car yourself, you might
be a little more bloody lenient with
your senior players, who’ve kicked
off, as you can imagine – being denied
what’s rightfully theirs.

BOLTON
Never come between a footballer and
his motor!

CLOUGH
No.

BOLTON
Especially not Billy bloody Bremner.

CLOUGH smiles nervously, visibly relieved…
CLOUGH
Is that it, then?

CUSSINS
Why? You look white as a ghost, man.

CUSSINS tightens his grip again, arm round CLOUGH.
Unmistakably intimidating..

CUSSINS (cont’d)
What did you think we’d asked you up
here for?

CUSSINS’s eyes. CLOUGH’s eyes. The air crackling with menace
and intent.
CUT TO:

117 OMITTED 117

118 INT. HOSPITAL – DAY 118

CLOUGH visits PETER TAYLOR in a large, crowded ward of old,
infirm, dying people. It’s a shock.

CLOUGH
Heart attack, eh?

TAYLOR
Had it three weeks ago, they reckon.

(CO NTINU ED)

69A
118 CON TINUE D: 118

TAYLOR (cont’d)
They ran all kinds of tests. Asked me
about my diet and my family history.
(MO RE)

(CO NTINU ED)

70
118 CON TINUE D: (2) 118
TAY LOR (cont’d)
I told them the only thing they needed
to know was that I share my
professional life with Brian Clough.
That seemed to satisfy them.

CLOUGH manages a smile. Moved.

TAYLOR (cont’d)
I’m only half-joking, you know. Have
we still got jobs?

CLOUGH
We have. Longson’s tried to put a
gagging order on me, of course.
(mimics)
“Any further utterances in public or
appearances in the media by Brian
Clough will be met with instant
dismissal.”
TAYLOR
Well, I hope you take notice. And act
accordingly.

CLOUGH
Would you like to hear my contrite
reply?

CLOUGH pulls out a letter..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
“Due to the complete breakdown in
communication with the chairman, Peter
Taylor and I find it is impossible to
continue our good work for Derby
County. We therefore wish to tender
our resignations with immediate
effect.”

TAYLOR
(horrified)
WHAT??!?

CLOUGH
What do you think?

TAYLOR
I don’t want to resign.

(CO NTINU ED)

71
118 CON TINUE D: (3) 118

CLOUGH
No. Nor do I. Don’t worry, they’ll
never let us. We just won them the
championship. But it will strengthen
our position and force them to get rid
of Longson.

TAYLOR
What? Oh, no, Brian. They’ll never do
THAT. He’s Chairman.

CLOUGH
I can’t do it, Pete. I can’t work with
my hands tied, a Chairman telling me
what I can or cannot do.

TAYLOR
You’re picking the wrong enemy. The
enemy’s not Longson. It’s Revie. And
your obsession with Leeds.
CLOUGH
Don’t be daft. We won the league,
Pete. We’re top dogs in Derby now. And
Longson can’t stand it. That’s the
problem.

TAYLOR
No, it’s not. It’s YOU. This monster
in you. This mad ambition. It comes
and goes. Sometimes it’s good…a
fire, that stirs everything up, and
then there’s this…this thing that
takes you over…and destroys
everything that is good in your life.
TAYLOR’s face…

TAYLOR (cont’d)
Please tell me this letter is just a
draft. You haven’t sent it. Because
I’ll be out in a couple of days…let
me talk to them.

118A INT. CORRIDOR – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY 118A

“Crash”, door fly open. CLOUGH storms down a corridor.

72

119 INT. BOARDROOM – BASEBALL GROUND – DAY 119

“Bang”, CLOUGH crashes into the boardroom. When they see
CLOUGH, voices fall silent. They stiffen..

CLOUGH
What are you doing? You weren’t
supposed to accept our resignations.

LONGSON
`Shouldn’t bloody well offer them,
then.

CLOUGH turns to the other DIRECTORS…

CLOUGH
I only did because of HIM!
(points at LONGSON)
You can’t get rid of us. It’d be a
disaster for the club. For the whole
of Derby.

LONGSON
You can’t keep shooting your mouth off
the way you have been…or issuing
these ultimatums..

The board stare at one another, avoid eye contact..

LONGSON (cont’d)
With great reluctance your
resignations have been accepted.

CLOUGH
You can’t do this! It’s madness!
LONGSON
The decision stands. And don’t even
think of a settlement. You’re getting
nowt.

CLOUGH
We’re going to create a footballing
dynasty here. Derby could be one of
the greats alongside United,
Liverpool, Leeds..

CLOUGH stands in the middle of the room. Speechless.

LONGSON
Car keys on the table and out!

CLOUGH stares in disbelief at the other BOARD MEMBERS..

(CO NTINU ED)

73
119 CON TINUE D: 119

CLOUGH
Does none of you have the guts to stop
this?

LONGSON
Now! And don’t show your faces here
again!

CLOUGH stares in disbelief at the assembled board members of
Derby County..

ROY KIRKLAND, ROBERTSON-KING, KEELING, SAM LONGSON, et al.
Blazers and brass buttons. The sound of clearing throats..

119A ARCHIVE NEWS FOOTAGE – (1973) 119A

News footage: Prime Minister Ted Heath announcing blackouts
due to the oil crisis. Britain is plunged into power-cuts.
And total darkness. Three days a week.

120 OMITTED 120

120A OMITTED 120A

121 OMITTED 121

74

122 INT. CLOUGH HOUSE – DERBY – NIGHT – (1973) 122

TAYLOR walks through the open door.

A meeting is underway in the CLOUGH house.

In the hall: CLOUGH’s three CHILDREN stare through banister
railings..

The smoke-filled front room is packed with FRIENDS,
RELATIVES, LAWYERS, DERBY COUNTY CLUB EMPLOYEES..

Newspapers are strewn over the table. CLOUGH sits in the
corner, being given counsel by SOLICITORS. JIMMY GORDON reads
out a letter from the DERBY PLAYERS…

JIMMY
“To the directors of Derby County
Football Club. We, the undersigned
players, are unanimous in our support
and respect for Mr. Clough and Mr.
Taylor and ask that they be reinstated
as manager and assistant manager of
the club.”

Cheers and celebrations. CLOUGH is congratulated. Handshakes.
Hair ruffled..

JIMMY (cont’d)
“Signed by John O’Hare, Roy
MacFarland, Colin Todd, Archie
Gemmill, Kevin Hector, Alan Hinton..”

TAYLOR
But not Dave Mackay.

(CO NTINU ED)

75
122 CON TINUE D: 122

Silence. All voices stop. Heads turn.

TAYLOR (cont’d)
Who’s just accepted the job.

Deathly silence. The crowds part. CLOUGH sits up, and
stares..

CLOUGH
What? Dave MACKAY?

TAYLOR
It’s in the evening paper.

CLOUGH
I signed that fat fuck – saved his
professional life. Gave him two more
years as a player, as my captain. Dave
Mackay?
(a beat)
He wouldn’t fucking DARE!

CLOUGH sees the paper. “MACKAY TO BE DERBY MANAGER”. CLOUGH’s
face. Devastated.

TAYLOR
Why did you do it? I love this place,
Brian. I’m happy here. So are you.

CLOUGH
It’s not over yet, Pete. The lawyers
are issuing a writ tomorrow. Against
Longson. The players are calling a
meeting. There’s talk of them coming
out on strike. There’s protest marches
scheduled for this week-end.

TAYLOR
Why couldn’t you just have kept your
mouth shut? We’ll never find anywhere
like this again.

TAYLOR stares. Worried. At that moment, BARBARA sticks her
head outside.

BARBARA
(holding phone)
Mike Bamber on the phone?

CLOUGH
Who’s Mike Bamber??

TAYLOR
Manager of Brighton and Hove Albion.
Someone who wants to offer us a job.
(CO NTINU ED)

75A
122 CON TINUE D: (2) 122

OVER THIS: the sound of a referee’s whistle..

123 OMITTED 123

76

124 EXT. DUGOUT – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 124

With a loud ROAR the game against Luton gets under way.

CLOUGH takes his seat alone in the dugout. Unseen by him, in
the stands behind him…

DON REVIE arrives, shaking hands, taking a seat.

Immediately, as soon as they see REVIE, the LEEDS FANS start
cheering, “There’s only one Don Revie..”

CLOUGH turns, to see REVIE. Waving back. Acknowledging the
crowd.

The LEEDS FANS chant, “There’s only one Don Revie!”

In the directors’ box, MANNY CUSSINS notes the reaction of
the crowd.

(CO NTINU ED)

77
124 CON TINUE D: 124

In the press boxes, the JOURNALISTS and TV COMMENTATORS also
note the reaction of the crowd…

CLOUGH’s face: stinging with humiliation. And as if that
weren’t bad enough…

“RRROOOOAAARRRRR”, Luton score a goal.

In the director’s box: MANNY CUSSINS’ face..

125 INT. TUNNEL – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 125

Afterwards: CLOUGH and the PLAYERS walk down the tunnel to
see MANNY CUSSINS and SAM BOLTON waiting. Grim-faced.

CUSSINS
Players Lounge, Brian. Ten minutes.

CLOUGH opens his mouth, is about to reply, but CUSSINS has
turned and walked away.

126 INT. PLAYERS’ LOUNGE – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974) 126

CLOUGH walks in as several players walk in, too. CLOUGH takes
a seat. CUSSINS calls for quiet…

CUSSINS
This is the worst start to a season
Leeds has had in twenty years. Four
points from five games? Second from
fucking bottom? What’s going on? As
far as I can I see, there’s no
relationship, no understanding between
players and management. Not a healthy
one, anyway.

PLAYERS heads low. Avoiding CLOUGH’s eyes.

BREMNER
Perhaps if Mr. Clough were to step
outside, we would all feel a little
more like speaking our minds.

CLOUGH can’t help smiling..

CLOUGH
(under his breath)
You bastard.

Of course, CUSSINS will reprimand him. Refuse his request.
CUSSINS looks at WOODWARD and BOLTON. Then..

(CO NTINU ED)

78
126 CON TINUE D: 126

CUSSINS
All right. If you wouldn’t mind,
Brian? Just for a minute or two?

CLOUGH cannot believe his ears. What?? He gets to his feet.

CLOUGH
As you wish.

CLOUGH walks out of the room. DUNCAN MACKENZIE watches.
Visibly shocked.

127 INT. CORRIDOR – ELLAND ROAD – DAY – (1974 127

CLOUGH closes the door behind him. He stands in the corridor
outside. From inside, we hear..

BREMNER (O.S.)
No one likes him. The atmosphere in
the dressing-room is non-existent.
We’re not allowed to mention Mr.
Revie’s name…

GILES (O.S.)
He’s banned us from doing all the
things we used to do…like playing
bingo and carpet bowls…

BREMNER (O.S.)
Tactically, he’s never prepared, never
tells us how he wants us to play…

HUNTER (O.S.)
You know he’s just itching to bring in
a whole lot of new players..

CLOUGH looks out of the window to see DON REVIE signing
autographs, shaking hands with adoring LEEDS FANS outside..

VOICE
What’s going on?

CLOUGH turns to see JIMMY GORDON..

CLOUGH
The last two words of every story ever
written is what’s going on. “The
fucking end.”

(CO NTINU ED)

79
127 CON TINUE D: 127

BREMNER (O.S.)
What I want to know is why, after all
the thing he’s said about us, did you
appoint him in the first place?

CLOUGH
I’m about to go home and work out how
much I want in severance pay. Don’t
worry, I’ll make sure your job is
safe.

JIMMY
I’m not staying here without you. No
bloody way.

CLOUGH
Then I suggest you go home and do the
same.

BREMNER (O.S.)
What me and the lads are trying to
say, Mr. Cussins, is that compared to
Mr. Revie – he’s just not good
enough…

CLOUGH: a dagger in his heart..

CLOUGH
Come on.

CLOUGH turns, leading JIMMY GORDON away, then he stops.
Having seen something through a window..

Outside: DON REVIE walks down into the car park and towards
his car – cheered and clapped every step of the way by LEEDS
FANS..

The Messiah of West Yorkshire…

CUT TO

128 EXT. BRIGHTON – DAY – (1974) 128

Seagulls wheeling. CLOUGH’s car pulls up in a hotel car park.
He and PETER TAYLOR get out on a road overlooking the sea..

CLOUGH looks around at his surroundings. The OLD PEOPLE. The
retirement home feel.

CLOUGH
(singing)
“Oh, I don’t like to be beside the
seaside..”

(CO NTINU ED)

79A
128 CON TINUE D: 128

TAYLOR
C’mon, just give it a chance.

(CO NTINU ED)

80
128 CON TINUE D: (2) 128

CLOUGH
Brighton and Hove Albion? Have you
seen where they are? Bottom of the
third division.

TAYLOR
And we can get them out of there. Like
that. We did it with Hartlepools. We
did it with Derby.

CLOUGH
We cared about Hartlepools and Derby.
We’re from the North, Pete. What do we
care about Brighton? Bloody
Southerners. Look where we are. We’re
almost in France.

TAYLOR
Hey, they’ve got money, this lot. And
ambition. And get a lungful of that
air. It’d be good for my health.

CLOUGH
You can’t manage a team that’s not
your own people. Not what you know.
Anyway the Protest Movement in Derby
is still in full flow. We could still
get our jobs back.

TAYLOR
No, we won’t. It’s over, Brian.
They’ll never take us back. Not now.

CLOUGH
What about proper clubs? Like
Manchester United? Or Spurs? Or
England, now Alf’s gone. Wouldn’t you
fancy that?

TAYLOR
No one’s rung, have they? You’ve
scared them all off.

CLOUGH
It’s only been a couple of weeks.

TAYLOR
C’mon. Just listen to them? Please?
For me?

80A

129 INT. BRIGHTON HOTEL – DAY – (1974) 129

MIKE BAMBER and HARRY BLOOM, Brighton Chairman and Vice-
Chairman, likeable men, (for the first time NOT in blazers
and brass buttons), sit opposite CLOUGH and TAYLOR…

(CO NTINU ED)

81
129 CON TINUE D: 129

BAMBER
Sign today, I’ll give you a bonus of
seven grand. Each.

TAYLOR
Seven grand? Y’hear that, Brian?

BAMBER
Plus a salary that exceeds by twenty
percent what Derby were paying you.

TAYLOR
Very generous, Mike. Terrific.

CLOUGH
But those are first division wages.

BAMBER
First division’s where I want this
club to be.
CLOUGH
Are you sure you can afford it?

BAMBER
Are you sure you’re worth it?

CLOUGH
Cheeky sod.

BAMBER offers his hand. CLOUGH stares at it..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
We’re going to need a holiday first.
BAMBER
Take as long as you like.

CLOUGH
Two weeks. Somewhere hot. On you.

BAMBER doesn’t even flinch. Smiles..

BAMBER
I’ll even throw in the bloody trunks.

CLOUGH and BAMBER shake. TAYLOR beams with delight. OVER
THIS: we fade in the sound of classical Spanish guitar..

130 EXT. MAJORCA – DAY – (1974) 130

Shimmering heat. Azure skies. Packed sandy beaches.

We’re in a resort in Southern Majorca. Calla Millor.
(CO NTINU ED)

81A
130 CON TINUE D: 130

Red-faced Brits. Sausages and chips. Beer and sun tan lotion.

On the beach, BARBARA CLOUGH is playing with the three CLOUGH
KIDS in the shallow water. They wave over to Brian.

CLOUGH, sitting in the sand, sunning-himself. (Reading a
newspaper about DON REVIE’s flirting with the England job).

82

131 OMITTED 131

132 OMITTED 132

133 OMITTED 133

134 OMITTED 134

135 OMITTED 135

136 EXT. HOTEL – MAJORCA – DAY – (1974) 136

A blazer with buttons. A red-faced, official-looking MAN in
his mid 50’s, being pointed onto a beach by a hotel EMPLOYEE.

(CO NTINU ED)

82A
136 CON TINUE D: 136

Red-faced, perspiring, ARCHER nods. Starts walking onto the
beach.

83

137 EXT. BEACH – MAJORCA – DAY – (1974) 137

KEITH ARCHER walks across the beach, the scalding sand,
sweating under the merciless sun…

Until he finds CLOUGH. ARCHER takes out his handkerchief,
mops his brow..

ARCHER
You’re a hard man to find, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH
Who’s looking?

ARCHER
My name’s Keith Archer. Secretary of
Leeds United football club.

CLOUGH looks up, can’t help smiling..
CLOUGH
Then what are you doing here, Keith?
Because from what I’m reading in my
paper, and from what I hear on the
jungle drums, you’ve got a bit of a
problem at home with your manager
flirting with the England job.

ARCHER
He’s not flirting…

CLOUGH
(indignant, pointing to
newspaper)
`Ey, it says it right here.
ARCHER
He’s taken it.

CLOUGH turns, squints in the light…

ARCHER (cont’d)
Which bring me to the point of my
visit.

BARBARA and PETER TAYLOR look over from the beach, concerned.
KEITH ARCHER smiles nervously, politely raising his hat…

137A OMITTED 137A

83A

138 EXT. BEACH – MAJORCA – (1974) 138

Seagulls wheeling. Two tiny specks on the beach in the
distance, arguing. Silhouettes against the setting sun..

TAYLOR
Bloody hell. But we HATE Leeds.

CLOUGH
It’s the top flight, Pete. The First
Division.

TAYLOR
But we’ve given Brighton our word. And
they’ve paid us the money.

CLOUGH
We can pay BACK the money. Bollocks to
bloody Brighton.
(laughing now, a
dismissive wave)
I’d go mad. We’d ALL go mad down
there.

TAYLOR
Please…give it a year. Give it a
chance.

CLOUGH
A year? It’d be death. Death for us
all.

TAYLOR
Mike Bamber is a good man..
CLOUGH
Oh, do me a favour..

TAYLOR
He had faith in us, offered us a job
when no one would.

CLOUGH
He offered us a job. And now someone
else has offered us a better one..and
not just anyone. The best team in the
country. C’mon, Pete, you know what
that means.. It’d be the Charity
Shield at Wembley in a months time.
The European Cup after..

TAYLOR
Yes, but even if we won them it would
always be Revie’s achievements. HIS
team..
(MO RE) (CO NTINU ED)

83AaA
138 CON TINUE D: 138
TAY LOR (cont’d)
(fretting)
I can’t do it. I gave Brighton my
word.

(CO NTINU ED)

83AA
138 CON TINUE D: (2) 138

CLOUGH
What? And you’d sooner fester down
there? With all those fucking Tories?
In that blue-rinse retirement home by
the sea?

TAYLOR
Yes, Brighton is a small club..

CLOUGH
Fucking midgets.

TAYLOR
But at least we’d be together, you and
me. We could build them up. Make them
our own. Like we did with Hartlepools.
Like we did with Derby.

CLOUGH
And then what? Bottle again as soon as
it comes to the big time. That’s
always been the trouble with you,
Pete. No ambition.

TAYLOR
And that’s the trouble with you. Too
much ambition. Too much greed. Too
much everything.

CLOUGH
You knock it, but it’s done you proud
over the years. My “ambition”. Without
me – you’d still be stuck in Burton
Albion. On the arse of the footballing
earth.
TAYLOR
But without you I’d still have a job
in Derby. A job and a home that I
love.
(a beat)
Yes, Brian – you’re the shop window,
I’ll grant you that. The razzle and
the bloody dazzle. But I’m the goods
at the back. And without me, without
someone to save you from yourself,
you’re not just half..
(tapping brain)
…you’re nothing.

TAYLOR starts to walk. CLOUGH calls after him..

(CO NTINU ED)

83AB
138 CON TINUE D: (3) 138

CLOUGH
I’m nothing? I’m nothing?? Don’t make
me laugh? So what does that make you,
Taylor? Something?? You’re half of
nothing!! Nothing’s parasite! A big
fat pilot fish that FEEDS on nothing!!
A bloody nobody!! The forgotten man!!
History’s fucking afterthought!!

TAYLOR walks off, leaving CLOUGH…

TAYLOR
Well, let’s see, shall we?

84

139 OMITTED 139

85-86

140 INT. BOARDROOM – ELLAND ROAD – EVENING – (1974) 140

The LEEDS BOARD MEMBERS’ faces: MANNY CUSSINS, SAM BOLTON,
KEITH ARCHER, SYDNEY SIMON, PERCY WOODWARD, etc

CUSSINS
Let’s be honest. It’s not working, is
it?

CLOUGH
What’s not working? I haven’t been
here five minutes, so how can anything
be working yet?

CUSSINS
Still…the players aren’t happy.
We’re not happy.

CLOUGH
So what do you want to do about it?
CUSSINS
If it’s not working, then we’ll have
to part company.

CLOUGH
Fine. It’ll cost you twenty-five
grand.

The Leeds BOARD MEMBERS choke…

CUSSINS
What? For six weeks work?

CLOUGH
Plus three and a half grand for Jimmy
Gordon. And an agreement that Leeds
United will pay both our income taxes
for the next three years.

The Leeds BOARD MEMBERS choke…

CUSSINS
That’s bloody criminal.

CLOUGH
No, what’s criminal, Mr. Cussins, is
the way you as Chairman asked me to
leave the room like that in front of
the players. Your MANAGER. Going
behind my back like that.

CUSSINS
I admit, that was wrong.

(CO NTINU ED)

87
140 CON TINUE D: 140

CLOUGH
And you can throw in the Merc and all.

BOLTON
What?

CLOUGH
Might be a bit flash for a man out of
a job, but the truth is, I’ve grown to
like it.

CUSSINS
Who the bloody hell do you think you
are?

CLOUGH
Brian Clough. Brian Howard Clough.

CUSSINS
Aye. No danger of me forgetting THAT
name in a hurry.

141 INT. MANAGER’S OFFICE – DAY – (1974) 141

CLOUGH and his SONS are packing together CLOUGH’s belongings
in a couple of boxes. A knock at the door..

DUNCAN MACKENZIE comes in, in track suit, a cigarette in
hand. Ready for the day’s training..

MACKENZIE
Just wanted to say, it’s not right.
They should have given you more time.
CLOUGH
Good lad.

MACKENZIE
Not just me that feels that way,
either.

CLOUGH
The sad thing is, it won’t work. You
can’t change a manager like a pair of
socks. It’ll happen once, to me – and
never again.

CLOUGH shakes CLARKE’s hand.

`Rrrrinng’, the phone rings. CLOUGH turns and picks up the
phone. He listens, then..

(CO NTINU ED)

88
141 CON TINUE D: 141

CLOUGH (cont’d)
(into phone)
All right. But you’ll have to make it
quick.

CLOUGH hangs up. Looks at his SONS..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Something we have to do on the way.
Won’t take long.

142 OMITTED 142

143 INT. YORKSHIRE TV STUDIOS – DAY – (1974) 143

CLOUGH sits in make-up. The door opens and AUSTIN MITCHELL,
the same presenter as earlier, sticks his head round the
corner..
MITCHELL
Thanks for agreeing to this.

CLOUGH
No problem.

CLOUGH smiles. Uncharacteristically vulnerable.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Go easy on me, though. There’s a good
lad.

144 INT. YORKSHIRE TV STUDIOS – DAY – (1974) 144
CLOUGH is led into the studio, and onto the `Calender’ set,
chatting to the SOUND MAN.

CLOUGH’s microphone is fixed, he is shown to his seat beside
the PRESENTER’s. Then CLOUGH notices a third (empty) seat
beside his..

CLOUGH
What’s this? We expecting guests?

Then CLOUGH looks up to see a distinctive BLUE BLAZER, with
gold buttons approaching the set…

Blue blazer. DON’s blazer.

(CO NTINU ED)

89
144 CON TINUE D: 144

CLOUGH’s face falls as DON REVIE and AUSTIN MITCHELL turn the
corner, in conspiratorial conversation, and out to the
seats..

It’s a set-up! CLOUGH looks over at AUSTIN MITCHELL and the
crew, who shiftily avoids CLOUGH’s eyes..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
You bastards!

REVIE is put in the seat beside CLOUGH. Avoiding CLOUGH’s
eyes. REVIE rolls his neck, crosses his legs. Vast,
intimidating REVIE. Ready for battle.

Suddenly, the theme music plays, the FLOOR MANAGER counts
down..

FLOOR MANAGER
Five, four, three..
The PRESENTER looks up..

MITCHELL
Good evening. Tonight the football
world was stunned by the news that
Brian Clough has been sacked as
manager of Leeds United. We’ll be
talking not just to Brian Clough, but
also to the man he replaced, who’s
success he couldn’t emulate, Don
Revie.

MITCHELL turns to CLOUGH..

MITCHELL (cont’d)
To Brian Clough first of all. What’s
your reaction to being sacked in this
fashion?

CLOUGH
Obviously, Austin, my initial reaction
is one of shock at finding myself here
with Revie…

REVIE
See? Not so easy to make accusations
when it’s to someone’s face…

CLOUGH
…but in answer to your question, six
weeks is hardly a long time to be
given a chance in any job. I would
hope Revie would get a lot longer time
in his.

(CO NTINU ED)

89A
144 CON TINUE D: (2) 144

MITCHELL
Do you consider it was possible to
step into your shoes, Don Revie? To
replace you?

REVIE
Being very, very honest, I think it
was a difficult job for anyone to do.
But I do feel Brian Clough, I won’t
call him Clough because I won’t take
him down like that..

CLOUGH
Thank you.

(CO NTINU ED)

90
144 CON TINUE D: (3) 144

REVIE
…I do feel he made it harder for
himself than he need have.

CLOUGH
How did I do that, Don?

REVIE
Shooting his mouth off about how dirty
my players were.

CLOUGH
Well, you WERE dirty, Don!

REVIE
That’s not true. The last four
seasons, we’ve topped the charts for
entertaining football.

CLOUGH
And before that, you also topped ALL
the disciplinary charts. You should
have been docked points and sent DOWN
to the second Division.

MITCHELL
And in fact, you went on record and
said so, Brian Clough. Again and
again. That Leeds should, in fact, be
relegated.

CLOUGH
And I was right.

MITCHELL
Do you think that might have hurt your
chances of success when you then came
to manage them?

REVIE
Of course it did! The things he said?
Why, man? Why did you take the job in
the first place?

CLOUGH
Because I thought it was the best job
in the country.

REVIE
Of course it was the best job in the
country.

CLOUGH
I was taking over the League
Champions.
(CO NTINU ED)

90aA
144 CON TINUE D: (4) 144

REVIE
You were. You were taking over the
best bunch of players you’d ever seen.

(CO NTINU ED)

90A
144 CON TINUE D: (5) 144

CLOUGH
And I fancied winning the league, and
winning Europe, and doing it better
than you.

REVIE
There’s no way you COULD win it
better.

CLOUGH
But that’s the only hope I’ve got.

REVIE
I only lost four matches..

CLOUGH
Well, I can only lose three.

REVIE
No, no, no, no.
CLOUGH
And still play attractive, clean
football. Without cheating!

REVIE
See, there he goes again..

MITCHELL
Listening to you, I am struck that
this is not just a business matter for
you both. It’s more than that. It’s
personal. Am I right?

CLOUGH
Well, we’re very different people, Don
and I. We have different styles. In
football and in life. I’m a warm man.
An idealist. I do believe in faeries,
and that is my outlook. Don is
different. There’s a hardness to him.
A hardness. Maybe he’s not even aware
of it. But he’s a cold person.

REVIE
You don’t KNOW me!

(CO NTINU ED)

91
144 CON TINUE D: (6) 144

CLOUGH
And that lack of warmth. That coldness
was there. Permeated the club when I
arrived.

REVIE
I totally refute that. The atmosphere
at Leeds was like a family. A happy
family. You ask any of my players. I
signed most of them personally. Knew
their backgrounds. Their parents.
Their streets. I was a father to them.
In that club every morning. Massaging
those boys. Did you do that for them?

CLOUGH
They would never have let me.

REVIE
Did you try? You didn’t even try. I
soaped those boys down with my own
hands. You just went to Leeds with no
thought for the club, no thought for
the players. Just on some kind of mad
personal vendetta with me.

CLOUGH
Well are you surprised? What else was
I going to do?? After what you did…

REVIE
What did I do?

CLOUGH
C’mon, Don. You know exactly.
(MORE)

(CO NTINU ED)

92
144 CON TINUE D: (7) 144

CLOUGH (cont’d)
4th March 1968. See? I even remember
the date. You came to Derby County,
the third round of the FA Cup, and you
refused to shake my hand.

AUSTIN MITCHELL looks up. The CAMERAMEN look up.

REVIE
Never! Matter of principle! I always
shake the other manager’s hand!

CLOUGH
You shook Peter Taylor’s hand, and my
trainer, Jimmy Gordon’s.

REVIE
Then I probably didn’t see you!!

CLOUGH
No, you saw me Don. But considered me
beneath you. Looked down on me. And
dismissed me. Just like you did every
other club and every other manager in
the country.

(CO NTINU ED)

93
144 CON TINUE D: (8) 144

REVIE
Never would I knowingly refuse to
shake a colleague’s hand. The truth
is, I probably just didn’t know who
you were.

CLOUGH
(a knowing smile)
“Didn’t know who I was!” Pull the
other one.

REVIE
It’s the truth.

(CO NTINU ED)

94
144 CON TINUE D: (9) 144

CLOUGH
(blurts out)
Well, you certainly know it NOW.

All heads turn. That came out unintentionally loud.

REVIE
Oh, we ALL know it now.
(a beat)
We know you as the man who’s constant
outbursts, his defaming of fellow
professionals, have brought this game,
this beautiful game into disrepute.
Who had one of the best jobs in the
country, at Derby, and managed to get
the sack. Who had one of the best
partners in the game, in Peter Taylor,
and threw him away. Who was given the
greatest gift in British football
Leeds United, a team that in ten years
hasn’t finished outside the top four,
and took them to the bottom of the
first division. Yes, it’s fair to say
we all know who you are now.

AUSTIN MITCHELL’s eyes widen.

MITCHELL
OK, gentlemen, we’re going to have to
leave it there..

CLOUGH
Well, let’s see where we are in a
year’s time, Donald Revie.
REVIE
Dear oh dear..

CLOUGH
Let’s see where we both are in five!

AUSTIN MITCHELL
That’s it for tonight’s show. I’d like
to thank Brian Clough and Don Revie
for joining me…

REVIE
Thank you, Austin.

The show wraps up. Theme music starts playing. REVIE removes
his microphone, turns and walks out.

CLOUGH is left staring, hollow-eyed. Wishing the ground would
swallow him up..

94A

145 OMITTED 145

95

146 OMITTED 146

147 INT. CLOUGH’S MERCEDES – DAY – (1974) 147

“LEEDS UNITED FOOTBALL CLUB” written on the side of the
stadium.

CLOUGH’s car driver past.

147A INT. CLOUGH’S MERCEDES – DAY – (1974) 147A

Inside the car: CLOUGH drives, staring at the road ahead.
Talk on the radio of CLOUGH’s dismissal..

CLOUGH
Boys? Do you think your old man is a
fool?
SIMON/NIGEL
No.

CLOUGH
You’re wrong. He bloody is.

A silence. CLOUGH continues to drive.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
Who is the least mature person in this
car? Who most needs to bloody grow up?
Who’s been making a right arse of
himself the past few months?

The BOYS can’t help laughing..
CLOUGH (cont’d)
Who fancies a trip to the seaside? To
see Uncle Pete?

NIGEL/SIMON
Me!

CLOUGH
Me, and all.

CLOUGH’s foot hits the floor.

96

148 EXT. MOTORWAY – DAY – (1974) 148

CLOUGH’s Mercedes heads `South’, and accelerates into the
distance.

149 EXT. TAYLOR’S HOUSE – BRIGHTON – DAY – (1974) 149

PETER TAYLOR is working in the garden. He looks up to see
CLOUGH standing in the gate to his house..

TAYLOR looks at CLOUGH. Their eyes meet. A poignant moment.

TAYLOR
They’ve kicked you out, already?

CLOUGH
They have.

TAYLOR
So how long was that?

CLOUGH
Forty-four days.

TAYLOR
Impressive.

TAYLOR strains not to show his satisfaction..

TAYLOR (cont’d)
So what are you doing here?

CLOUGH
Don’t make this difficult for me,
Pete…you know why I’m here…and I
won’t bloody grovel.

TAYLOR shrugs, “Please yourself”. Turns and starts walking
inside.

CLOUGH (cont’d)
All right. I’m grovelling. I’m on my
knees.

TAYLOR turns. Sees CLOUGH on his knees. Begging for
forgiveness.

TAYLOR
“I apologize unreservedly for being a
twat”.

(CO NTINU ED)

97
149 CON TINUE D: 149

CLOUGH
I apologize for being a twat.

TAYLOR
“Unreservedly.”

CLOUGH
(through gritted teeth)
Unreservedly…

TAYLOR
“Because I can’t do it without you.”

CLOUGH
Because I can’t do it without you.

TAYLOR
“I’m nothing without you.”

CLOUGH
I’m nothing without you.

TAYLOR
“Please, please baby, take me back.”

CLOUGH
Fuck off..!

CLOUGH tails off, realizing he has no option..

CLOUGH (cont’d)
“Please, please baby, take me back.”

CLOUGH’s sons watch from the car as PETER TAYLOR opens his
arms, and the two MEN fall into an embrace.
But in the clench, TAYLOR’s smile fades, his expression
suddenly becoming serious.

TAYLOR holds CLOUGH tight, and whispers…

TAYLOR
You’ll only fuck me up again, won’t
you?

CLOUGH
I love you, y’know.

TAYLOR
I know. But it won’t stop you.

A beat. CLOUGH thinks, then..

(CO NTINU ED)


149 CON TINUE D: (2) 149

CLOUGH
So? Would you sooner go through it all
without me?

TAYLOR’s face: freeing and condemning himself at once..

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